Letter

Scope and Content

From John Fennel in Bradford to Mary Fletcher. It will please Fletcher to be informed that providence has opened his way into the Church of England - he was ordained last Sunday by the Archbishop of York and presented to the curacy of Keighley. The Rector of the parish is a pious man, one Revd. [Theodore] Dury from around London who has lately succeeded to the living of Keighley.

The population is great and the 'situation' important. 'I understand they love the plain gospel of Jesus Christ….' Spiritual matters are discussed in detail. 'To preach is one thing - to be useful is another….'

Fletcher will also rejoice that a large number of pious men were also ordained at the same time from various parts of this large county - indeed it is good to see how rapidly religion is recovering among ministers of the Church of England in these parts. He would be grateful for a mention in Fletcher's prayers.

Fennel has not taken this step without mature deliberation and self-examination. He wishes only to move and work in the more active circles of the Church. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

His wife sends her regards together with those of Mr and Mrs [William] Morgan to Fletcher and [Mary] Tooth.

Revd. [John] Crosse [Evangelical Vicar of Bradford] is still strong and healthy, although quite blind. He preaches every Sunday afternoon.

Fennel is well and has not had a day of sickness since he came to Yorkshire

Notes

  • Theodore Dury (1788-1850) was born at Hadley in Middlesex, the son of Colonel Alexander Dury. He was educated at Harrow School and Cambridge University. Ordained deacon in 1812, he served as Rector of the parishes of Keighley, Bolton-by-Bowland and Westmill. He was also chaplain to the Duke of Devonshire. Source: DNB under John Crosse and J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses (1951)
  • William Morgan was born probably in Bradford, Yorkshire. He was educated at Cambridge University and was ordained into the Anglican ministry in 1815. Morgan was the curate of Bradford between 1815 and 1851 and was closely associated with the noted evangelical Rector of the parish John Crosse, whose biography he wrote in 1841. Morgan was Rector of Hulcott in Buckinghamshire from 1851 to 1858 and vanished from the Clergy List in 1867. Source: DNB under John Crosse and J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses (1951)
  • John Crosse (1739-1816) was the son of Hammond Crosse, gent. of Kensington, London. He was educated at a school near Barnet, Hertfordshire. It is not known when and by whom Crosse was ordained into the Anglican Church but as a young man he occupied curacies in Wiltshire and the Lock Chapel in London. From 1765 for three years he travelled around Europe and then completed studies at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, from where he graduated B.A. in 1768. In 1776 Crosse was incorporated B.A. at Cambridge and later took the degree of M.A. at King's College. After graduation Crosse held several curacies in the north of England before being appointed Vicar of Bradford in 1784. Crosse was a well-regarded evangelical who despite being afflicted with blindness during the last years of his life, continued to perform the offices of the Church until a fortnight before his death. Under the terms of his will, Crosse founded three theological scholarships at Cambridge University and left money in trust for the promotion of the 'cause of true religion'. His life was made the subject of a book by Rev. William Morgan in 1841. Source: Dictionary of National Biography

Note

Notes

  • Theodore Dury (1788-1850) was born at Hadley in Middlesex, the son of Colonel Alexander Dury. He was educated at Harrow School and Cambridge University. Ordained deacon in 1812, he served as Rector of the parishes of Keighley, Bolton-by-Bowland and Westmill. He was also chaplain to the Duke of Devonshire. Source: DNB under John Crosse and J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses (1951)
  • William Morgan was born probably in Bradford, Yorkshire. He was educated at Cambridge University and was ordained into the Anglican ministry in 1815. Morgan was the curate of Bradford between 1815 and 1851 and was closely associated with the noted evangelical Rector of the parish John Crosse, whose biography he wrote in 1841. Morgan was Rector of Hulcott in Buckinghamshire from 1851 to 1858 and vanished from the Clergy List in 1867. Source: DNB under John Crosse and J. A. Venn, Alumni Cantabrigienses (1951)
  • John Crosse (1739-1816) was the son of Hammond Crosse, gent. of Kensington, London. He was educated at a school near Barnet, Hertfordshire. It is not known when and by whom Crosse was ordained into the Anglican Church but as a young man he occupied curacies in Wiltshire and the Lock Chapel in London. From 1765 for three years he travelled around Europe and then completed studies at St Edmund Hall, Oxford, from where he graduated B.A. in 1768. In 1776 Crosse was incorporated B.A. at Cambridge and later took the degree of M.A. at King's College. After graduation Crosse held several curacies in the north of England before being appointed Vicar of Bradford in 1784. Crosse was a well-regarded evangelical who despite being afflicted with blindness during the last years of his life, continued to perform the offices of the Church until a fortnight before his death. Under the terms of his will, Crosse founded three theological scholarships at Cambridge University and left money in trust for the promotion of the 'cause of true religion'. His life was made the subject of a book by Rev. William Morgan in 1841. Source: Dictionary of National Biography