Letter

Scope and Content

From Birmingham. She is sorry that she has not written before this but has had terrible pain in her head. She was sorry to hear that Tooth has been so unwell, but she rejoices at the prospect of meeting one day in a place where the inhabitants never say that they are sick [heaven]. So many of Mr Jenkins’s family being called into eternity is a call to other people "be ye also ready".

Jordan would be grateful if Tooth could send some copies of Miss [Sarah] Jenkins’s biography [Memoirs of Sarah Jenkins by Mary Tooth (London, Methodist Book Room, 1829)] when it is ready, as she thinks that she can sell a few and she can send the money to Tooth when one of her friends visits Birmingham.

Miss Hudson will meet in Jordan’s Monday class. They have a Select Band at Mrs Guy’s on Wednesday evenings and Jordan invited Hudson to attend that also, which she was very willing to do. They find it very profitable. Mr [William] Gilpin also intends coming.

Their third preacher Mr [Thomas] Stead has had for many years a great desire to visit Madeley. He is known to Tooth’s Anglican Vicar [Joshua Gilpin?] and if Tooth could engineer an invitation for him to call, he would certainly come. Stead’s wife is a ‘very superior woman’ although Jordan has not heard her say anything about accompanying her husband.

Miss Suter keeps herself at a distance and Jordan only sees her sometimes and not since she [Jordan] received Tooth’s letter. ‘I called and told yong [young] Suter of the death of Miss J. [Sarah Jenkins?]. I am afraid covetousness creeps in among them and is an [unreadable word]’.

Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

Her regards should be passed to Mrs ‘Heard’ [Hurd], Miss Dorset, [Rosamund Tooth] and Mrs Griffiths.

Notes

  • William Gilpin (1772-1842) was born at Whitehaven, Cumberland. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1799 and exercised an active Circuit ministry until poor health forced him into superannuation in 1833. He died at Budleigh Salterton in Devon after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1844
  • Thomas Stead (1788-1872) was born near Halifax, Yorkshire, and received a good education. He was converted by Methodist preaching soon after leaving school and came to the notice of Jabez Bunting who recommended that he enter the itinerancy, which Stead did in 1812. His active circuit ministry of thirty-seven years was spent mainly in the Midlands and the North of England. He retired to Liverpool and then Southport. Source: Minutes of Conference 1873 and Hill’s Arrangement 1869

Note

Notes

  • William Gilpin (1772-1842) was born at Whitehaven, Cumberland. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1799 and exercised an active Circuit ministry until poor health forced him into superannuation in 1833. He died at Budleigh Salterton in Devon after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1844
  • Thomas Stead (1788-1872) was born near Halifax, Yorkshire, and received a good education. He was converted by Methodist preaching soon after leaving school and came to the notice of Jabez Bunting who recommended that he enter the itinerancy, which Stead did in 1812. His active circuit ministry of thirty-seven years was spent mainly in the Midlands and the North of England. He retired to Liverpool and then Southport. Source: Minutes of Conference 1873 and Hill’s Arrangement 1869