Letter

Scope and Content

From [South Petherton circuit]. Gregson received Tooth's kind letter. Spiritual matters are discussed.

They [Gregson and Boyce] dined yesterday at Mr Hurley's and met the second preacher, one [John] Symons who once had the pleasure of dining with Tooth in London. Symons has been extremely friendly to Gregson [and Boyce] and has allowed them the use of the pulpit [for preaching] twice.

They have heard that there is a stir among the people who have previously been very much against Methodism in this place and Gregson [and Boyce] have been specifically requested to stay over for another Sunday, which they have agreed to do. They will then return to Madeley. She remembers Mr Gourley's house [in Madeley] and agrees with Tooth that it would be very suitable if it is available for rent.

Gregson had a letter the other day from her dear sister Anne in answer to one which Gregson sent to her, expressing her intention to 'fix my [unreadable word] at Madeley'. Anne said that she would raise no selfish objection if that was Gregson's wish. Also, that Gregson was a magnet which would draw her and Henry a much greater distance than Madeley.

They are going this afternoon to take tea with a quakeress and they are likewise engaged tomorrow afternoon.

One of Mr Mallet's [relation of Sarah Boyce?] daughters has apparently been at the point of death but there is now hope that she will recover. The girl is aged about fifteen and had come down with a violent cold. They have not been staying in the same house as her.

Thursday 12 August

They intend, if they can get places [on the coach] to leave this place next Wednesday for Shrewsbury and will carry on to Madeley the following day. They will not expect to see Tooth at Shrewsbury as it is too far for her to come, but look forward with great pleasure to seeing her again in Madeley.

They hope that [Rosamund] is feeling better.

'Mrs Boyce is much as usual, earnest in the work, strengthened for it and weak after it'.

Note

  • John Symons (1797-1833) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1824 and served as a circuit minister in England for nine years until his death, which occurred at Torquay following a chest ailment. Symons was acquainted with and sympathetic to the female preachers Sarah Boyce and Martha Gregson. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection and Minutes of Conference 1833

Note

Note

  • John Symons (1797-1833) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1824 and served as a circuit minister in England for nine years until his death, which occurred at Torquay following a chest ailment. Symons was acquainted with and sympathetic to the female preachers Sarah Boyce and Martha Gregson. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection and Minutes of Conference 1833