Letter

Scope and Content

From Alscott to Mary Tooth. Mother is very ill and Jenkins does not wish to ask for leave to visit Madeley as this would leave her virtually alone in the house. She thinks that her eldest sister is going out.

Jenkins is pleased that her dear sister Jane is able to come and prays that it may be a blessing to her. Jane has certainly been looking forward to it for a long time. She thinks that her brother will also come at night and Tooth should speak to him about the meetings. ‘I think he does not [unreadable word] to with them at Wyken. With respect to this I will be guided by him and I know he will be guided by you & Mr [James] Gill .

’ She supposes that Miss James has told Tooth what a pleasant evening she spent in the company of Miss Bourne, Jenkins and Miss Bywater’s brother at the house of Jenkins’s cousin John [Wathers], who was also with them for part of the time. John behaved very well and said that he was prepared to sell them any of his land for a chapel. Jenkins does not know how this will turn out, but hopefully they will soon have one. Tooth’s advice as to the best way to proceed would be welcome.

Jenkins would be pleased to come the Love Feast if it is possible. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail. Her brother has just been telling her that he is feeling ill and will not be able to attend.

Her regards should be passed to Miss James and to [Rosamund Tooth].

In a postscript, she asks that Tooth send the ‘Christians’ and recommend the biography of John Wesley to her brother.

Note

  • James Gill (1770-1844) was converted at the age of twenty-two under the ministry of Joseph Benson. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation due to ill health in 1838. He retired to Dudley but continued to preach until a few months before his death which occurred at Northampton. Source: Minutes of Conference 1844 and Hill's Arrangement 1841

Note

Note

  • James Gill (1770-1844) was converted at the age of twenty-two under the ministry of Joseph Benson. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation due to ill health in 1838. He retired to Dudley but continued to preach until a few months before his death which occurred at Northampton. Source: Minutes of Conference 1844 and Hill's Arrangement 1841