Letter

Scope and Content

From 15 Davies Street, [Berkeley Square], London to Mary Tooth. She was grateful for Tooth’s last letter dated 18 January but was sorry to read of Tooth’s poor health, although it is hardly surprising with the weather being so trying to all constitutions. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Her regards should be passed to Mr and Mrs Norris.

That was indeed an awful instance of sudden death that Tooth mentioned and it reminds us to be more diligent in our work. Means often wishes that she was more in earnest about things which matter for eternal peace, but the world will crowd in, even in her best moments.

‘I am so much engaged in the business but I am far differently situated from members of my age who have no time whatever to call their own, and no opportunity of doing good in any way to their fellow creatures. I may indeed exclaim my lot is cast upon a pleasant place. I have kind friends and numerous mercies which I shall never appreciate sufficiently.’

She was sorry to hear of Mrs Harper’s illness. It is indeed a sad affliction for one with her prospects but it is not us to question the Lord’s will. She trusts that all will work out for the best for her. Spiritual matters are discussed.

That was a delightful instance of the good that prayer can do – the case of the young man ‘who now enjoys the privileges of the society and companionship which none but the Christian can experience.’

Last week they had a delightful meeting, expressly intended for Sunday School teachers ‘in connexion with the Union [Sunday School Union?] which was held at our chapel, two ministers addressed us. The first, Mr [John Partis] Haswell [stationed in the 6th London circuit between 1839 and 1842], who you may have heard of, because he belongs to the Wesleyans. His subject was to direct S. S. teachers in their work, the other was to encourage us by Mr Slater belonging to the Independents[?]. Both were alike excellent and I trust some good will be the result.’

She has not written to Rebecca since she received Tooth’s last letter. She would be grateful if Tooth could pass on Means’ best wishes to Rebecca’s aunt.

Means’ father has suffered a great deal from the scarcity of [unreadable word] but now he is his usual self and sometimes better, although occasionally he is in great pain.

Her regards should be passed to Miss Haslewood and Mr Waise who she was sorry to hear has not been well.

Note

  • John Partis Haswell (1790-1879) was born at Tantobie, County Durham. He was converted in early life and began to attend class meetings in 1808. He entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1812 and exercised an active circuit ministry in Scotland and England until superannuation in 1864. Haswell retired to Newcastle on Tyne and preached his last sermon on the day before he died. Source: Minutes of Conference 1870 and Hill’s Arrangement 1869

Note

Note

  • John Partis Haswell (1790-1879) was born at Tantobie, County Durham. He was converted in early life and began to attend class meetings in 1808. He entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1812 and exercised an active circuit ministry in Scotland and England until superannuation in 1864. Haswell retired to Newcastle on Tyne and preached his last sermon on the day before he died. Source: Minutes of Conference 1870 and Hill’s Arrangement 1869