Letter

Scope and Content

From Isaac D'Olier at 18 Bagot Street, Dublin. Fletcher cannot be expected to recollect D'Olier himself, although she might recall his name and family. She may perhaps have heard that he is married to a daughter of the excellent and pious Henry Brooke, who died in October 1806. D'Olier has been pressed to write something of a memoir of him, 'to prevent so much excellence being buried in oblivion; but have still declined the work from a consciousness of not being able to write his life with that justice which his character deserves…' However as no-one else would undertake it, he has finally consented to do it and is therefore collecting materials.

It is with great reluctance that he troubles Fletcher on this occasion, but he is aware that Brooke wrote some letters to [John] Fletcher and he would dearly love the favour of having the use of those where there is no objection to publish. She can rely on his safe custody of them and their return by safe conveyance.

His sister Mrs Courtney had the pleasure of seeing Fletcher last summer when passing through Madeley to take her son to [Captain Howbry's] school in Devonshire. Spiritual matters are discussed.

In a postscript he mentions that the letters should be sent to him via William Taylor esq. of Dublin Castle, as they will then be conveyed free post.

Note

  • Henry Brooke (1738-1806) was born in C. Cavan, Ireland, the son of a Church of Ireland clergyman and nephew of Henry Brooke, author of The Fool of Quality. He trained as an artist in Dublin and in 1761 exhibited with great success in London. After six years in England Brooke returned to Dublin, but lost his savings through a bad investment. His painting continued to attract some praise and was principally employed in the decoration of Roman Catholic chapels. He also produced work on mystical/mythological themes, a reflection of his own spiritual taste. Brooke began to correspond with John Wesley in 1762 and joined the Methodists three years later. He frequently entertained Wesley during his visits to Dublin and was a minor benefactor of Wesley's will. He married Anne Mrchoffer in 1767. She was a correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Fletcher. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995) and Dictionary of National Biography

Note

Note

  • Henry Brooke (1738-1806) was born in C. Cavan, Ireland, the son of a Church of Ireland clergyman and nephew of Henry Brooke, author of The Fool of Quality. He trained as an artist in Dublin and in 1761 exhibited with great success in London. After six years in England Brooke returned to Dublin, but lost his savings through a bad investment. His painting continued to attract some praise and was principally employed in the decoration of Roman Catholic chapels. He also produced work on mystical/mythological themes, a reflection of his own spiritual taste. Brooke began to correspond with John Wesley in 1762 and joined the Methodists three years later. He frequently entertained Wesley during his visits to Dublin and was a minor benefactor of Wesley's will. He married Anne Mrchoffer in 1767. She was a correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Fletcher. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995) and Dictionary of National Biography