Letter

Scope and Content

From [Cornelius] Bastable in Cork, Ireland, to Sarah Ryan at the New Room in Bristol. What is wrong? Why hasn't Bastable received a reply to his letter? 'I long to hear of your trials and of the faithfulness of the Lord to your soul…' Spiritual matters are discussed in detail. 'I have been taught to say litel of what the Lord have dun in me and yet the [unreadable word] have found it out. I am becom a by word among them. They tell me plainly my doctrine is stricter than St Paul's; the upright in heart are comforted dayly…'

In a postscript he asks that the enclosed be sent to London. It is possible to find a vessel leaving every day from Bristol to Cork and a letter sent via any of them will find him alright. His love should be sent to Sister Clarke, Miss Greenhill[?] and all his other friends.

Note

  • Cornelius Bastable (d.1777) entered the Irish itinerancy in 1745. He laboured for many years in hard conditions and was described by John Wesley as 'an uncommon monument of the power of grace…for so weak a head and so bad a temper as he once had, I do not know among all our preachers'. Source: History of Methodism in Ireland (1885) Volume 1, by C. H. Crookshank, pp.171,174,177 and list of former preachers at the back of Hill's Arrangement

Note

Note

  • Cornelius Bastable (d.1777) entered the Irish itinerancy in 1745. He laboured for many years in hard conditions and was described by John Wesley as 'an uncommon monument of the power of grace…for so weak a head and so bad a temper as he once had, I do not know among all our preachers'. Source: History of Methodism in Ireland (1885) Volume 1, by C. H. Crookshank, pp.171,174,177 and list of former preachers at the back of Hill's Arrangement