Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 MAM/FL/4/15/12
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 MAM/FL/4/15/12
  • Dates of Creation
      18 Marv 1843 [postmark]

Scope and Content

[The handwriting is difficult to read at several points in this letter.]

From Birmingham. Ludlow received Tooth’s kind letter with the enclosed sovereign for which they are suitably grateful. She hopes to be able to pay it back.

Her and [William] have been married for fourteen years to the day. ‘It has been 2 sore apprenticeships in many respects yet we have been crowned with mercies…’ Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

She thinks that it as well that Rebecca is going to her ‘old spot’ again. She will certainly feel more at home ‘I hope she is getting ripe for glory’. Ludlow would like to hear how they are getting on now that they have a preacher and she hopes that she will be able to see Tooth soon. Her company would be very refreshing. Reference is made to her husband'’ 'trial’ [any general concern rather than a legal issue], after which she hopes to be able to visit Madeley. [Unreadable female name] has been looking for Ludlow for a long while ‘for Mr Hurst is more friendly. She is in a better way both as to body & mind. I am [unreadable word]Matthew Henry for her as well as myself & she is so delighted with it she never feels dull although very much alone. We shall bury one dear child on Monday. Pray much for me. It will be a trying time’. Young Mr Naylor is going to bury a child at the same time at the cemetery and has engaged [William Rogers] Williams to conduct the service, [stationed in the Birmingham Cherry Street circuit from 1843-44] so the Ludows will have him as well.

Ludlow has been able to go to class for the last five weeks but hopes to be able to return to it after tomorrow. Spiritual matters are discussed.

She hopes that Tooth will be spared some more years to labour for souls. ‘The prophetesses are now many & yet the labourers are few. I feel led to pray more for a renewal in the Church than anything else’.

Ludlow supposes that Tooth will have heard that there were some souls ‘much blessed’ in the other circuit. [From 1835 Birmingham was divided into two circuits centred on Cherry Street and Belmont Row Chapels respectively.] She supposes that [Ann] Jordan will give an account of it.

Notes

  • William Rogers Williams (1814 - 84) was born at Clifton near Bristol. His maternal uncle was James Bundy, ‘the prisoner’s friend’. He was converted at the age of eighteen and was a member of the same band as the prominent Wesleyan minister Samuel Romilly Hall (1812-76). Six months after his conversion, Williams began to preach locally and entered the itinerancy in 1836. With exception of two years superannuation during the mid-1860s, Williams served as a circuit minister in England and Wales until retirement in 1875. He suffered ‘severe family afflictions’ and poor health in his final years. He died on June 29th 1884. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1878 and Minutes of Conference 1884

Note

Notes

  • William Rogers Williams (1814 - 84) was born at Clifton near Bristol. His maternal uncle was James Bundy, ‘the prisoner’s friend’. He was converted at the age of eighteen and was a member of the same band as the prominent Wesleyan minister Samuel Romilly Hall (1812-76). Six months after his conversion, Williams began to preach locally and entered the itinerancy in 1836. With exception of two years superannuation during the mid-1860s, Williams served as a circuit minister in England and Wales until retirement in 1875. He suffered ‘severe family afflictions’ and poor health in his final years. He died on June 29th 1884. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1878 and Minutes of Conference 1884