Letter

Scope and Content

From George Clark at 3 Tabernacle Row, City Road, London, to Madeley. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail with particular reference to Fletcher being chosen by God 'to declare his mind and gracious will to the people…he [John Fletcher] broke up the fallow ground and you are sowing the seed'. Reference is made to Fletcher continuing the work of her late blessed husband John Fletcher.

God has given Clark some ability to instruct 'especially those that have believed, and several know and speak of the benefit received, but their number does not increase, for to this day I have no band, nor for two years past…I would live as you to some good purpose…help me, help me in your prayers'.

Clark's wife [Adylena] is in reasonable health. His daughter Mrs Waterhouse is likewise in good health 'but walking in the broadway' [ie not leading a Christian life?]. Daughter Sally is a comfort to her parents.

He was very pleased to hear of the 'grace of God' in [Melville] Horne and his wife [Adylena].

In a postscript, he adds that Fletcher's sister [Anne-Marie Gaussen] has sent an hymnal to him to pass on to Fletcher. [John] Allay will send it to Chester for her.

Note

  • Melville Horne (c.1761-c.1841) was the son of an Antiguan barrister and planter and the nephew of Nathaniel Gilbert (c.1721-1774) the pioneer of West Indian Methodism. Home entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1784 and was ordained into the Anglican ministry a short time after on John Wesley's recommendation. In 1786 he succeeded to the curacy at John Fletcher's old parish of Madeley, but retained his connection with Methodism and was appointed Superintendent of the new Wolverhampton circuit in 1787. In 1792 Home became chaplain of Sierra Leone in West Africa where he joined his second cousin Nathaniel Gilbert junior. He was however unable to adapt to the climate and returned to England in 1793 and published his Letters on Missions a year later. Home served as Vicar of Olney from 1796 to 1799 and then succeeded the evangelical minister David Simpson at Christ Church Macclesfield. Home enjoyed a close friendship with Jabez Bunting but this turned to coldness on both sides which culminated in Home's final break with Methodism in 1809. He later served Anglican parishes in Essex, Cornwall and Salford. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

Note

Note

  • Melville Horne (c.1761-c.1841) was the son of an Antiguan barrister and planter and the nephew of Nathaniel Gilbert (c.1721-1774) the pioneer of West Indian Methodism. Home entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1784 and was ordained into the Anglican ministry a short time after on John Wesley's recommendation. In 1786 he succeeded to the curacy at John Fletcher's old parish of Madeley, but retained his connection with Methodism and was appointed Superintendent of the new Wolverhampton circuit in 1787. In 1792 Home became chaplain of Sierra Leone in West Africa where he joined his second cousin Nathaniel Gilbert junior. He was however unable to adapt to the climate and returned to England in 1793 and published his Letters on Missions a year later. Home served as Vicar of Olney from 1796 to 1799 and then succeeded the evangelical minister David Simpson at Christ Church Macclesfield. Home enjoyed a close friendship with Jabez Bunting but this turned to coldness on both sides which culminated in Home's final break with Methodism in 1809. He later served Anglican parishes in Essex, Cornwall and Salford. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)