Letter

Scope and Content

From Miss Haseld? at Madeley to Mary Tooth at Mr Jordan’s House [husband of the prominent female Methodist Ann Jordan ], Withall Street, Birmingham. She has written this letter to inform her that on Sunday after the meeting, she received notice that the [class] tickets were to be renewed on the next day. ‘Mr [James] Smetham [appointed to Madeley in 1837 and Circuit Superintendent 1838-39] was [unreadable word], he did not give [unreadable word] notice and as it was impossible you could come in so so short a notice and as we expected to see you on 3? day, I considered it unnecessary to write, so I told him you was from home and he has deferred till a future time. I have not heard any thing respecting Coalport Chapel but I believe they are getting on. I was down on Sunday, Mr [Richard] Williams preached . Their tickets are to be given on 3? day…’

She has received two letters from Mrs Leey, one from Birmingham about the meeting. Reference is made to a preacher and to all the meetings being blessed.

Notes

  • Ann Jordan (1788-1852) was born in Birmingham. A pious child, she started attending Methodist class meetings at the age of thirteen and was converted within a few months despite much opposition from her family. Jordan became a Sunday School teacher at the age of eighteen and a class leader two years later. 'Her time. . . was almost entirely occupied with devotional and benevolent exercises, meeting classes, attending prayer meetings and visiting the sick and poor. . . '. Jordan had very close links with other notable Methodist women such as Mary Fletcher, Mary Tooth and Sarah Boyce. References in the Fletcher-Tooth correspondence indicate that she may also have preached. Her home became a focal point for Methodist activities in Birmingham and she influenced several men who later became ministers and missionaries. Jordan was bed-bound for two years before she died on October 5 1852. Source: Methodist Magazine 1855, p. 662 and Fletcher-Tooth collection
  • James Smetham (1792-1847) was converted at the age of thirteen and entered the itinerancy in 1812. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and Scotland until his death which occurred after a short illness while he was stationed in the Warrington circuit. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1847 and Minutes of Conference 1848

Note

Notes

  • Ann Jordan (1788-1852) was born in Birmingham. A pious child, she started attending Methodist class meetings at the age of thirteen and was converted within a few months despite much opposition from her family. Jordan became a Sunday School teacher at the age of eighteen and a class leader two years later. 'Her time. . . was almost entirely occupied with devotional and benevolent exercises, meeting classes, attending prayer meetings and visiting the sick and poor. . . '. Jordan had very close links with other notable Methodist women such as Mary Fletcher, Mary Tooth and Sarah Boyce. References in the Fletcher-Tooth correspondence indicate that she may also have preached. Her home became a focal point for Methodist activities in Birmingham and she influenced several men who later became ministers and missionaries. Jordan was bed-bound for two years before she died on October 5 1852. Source: Methodist Magazine 1855, p. 662 and Fletcher-Tooth collection
  • James Smetham (1792-1847) was converted at the age of thirteen and entered the itinerancy in 1812. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and Scotland until his death which occurred after a short illness while he was stationed in the Warrington circuit. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1847 and Minutes of Conference 1848