Letter

Scope and Content

From Andrew Phillips in Shifnall to [Mary] Tooth. He has been instructed by Messrs Richard Williams, William Harris, Edward Smith, Charles William Smith, Charles Clayton, John Lloyd and Isaac Thompson to inform her that Revd. Melville Horne, only surviving trustee appointed by an indenture of bargain and sale dated 25 November 1786 and enrolled in Chancery, has conveyed to the above-named several parties, the Methodist chapel at Madeley Wood with all its estates ‘upon the Trusts declared thereof by that deed’.

They also desire Phillips to say that as Tooth has generously ‘made herself liable to a debt on the chapel estate’ they feel it right to relieve her of that obligation and are willing to replace her security with their own whenever she thinks proper.

Notes

  • Richard Williams (d.1832) was a brazier in Ludlow, Shropshire. Despite opposition he was a member of the Methodist society in Ludlow for many years and served as a chapel trustee at Madeley Wood from 1807. Nevertheless he was not fully converted until a short time before his death which occurred in June 1832. Williams had been acquainted with the prominent female evangelists Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Mary Tooth. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832, p.689 and Fletcher-Tooth collection
  • Melville Horne (c.1761-c.1841) was the son of an Antiguan barrister and planter and the nephew of Nathaniel Gilbert (c.1721-1774) the pioneer of West Indian Methodism. Horne entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1784 and was ordained into the Anglican ministry a short time after on John Wesley's recommendation. In 1786 he succeeded to the curacy at John Fletcher's old parish of Madeley, but retained his connection with Methodism and was appointed Superintendent of the new Wolverhampton circuit in 1787. In 1792 Horne became chaplain of Sierra Leone in West Africa where he joined his second cousin Nathaniel Gilbert junior. He was however unable to adapt to the climate and returned to England in 1793 and published his Letters on Missions a year later. Horne served as Vicar of Olney from 1796 to 1799 and then succeeded the evangelical minister David Simpson at Christ Church Macclesfield. Horne enjoyed a close friendship with Jabez Bunting but this turned to coldness on both sides which culminated in Horne's final break with Methodism in 1809. He later served Anglican parishes in Essex, Cornwall and Salford. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

Note

Notes

  • Richard Williams (d.1832) was a brazier in Ludlow, Shropshire. Despite opposition he was a member of the Methodist society in Ludlow for many years and served as a chapel trustee at Madeley Wood from 1807. Nevertheless he was not fully converted until a short time before his death which occurred in June 1832. Williams had been acquainted with the prominent female evangelists Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Mary Tooth. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832, p.689 and Fletcher-Tooth collection
  • Melville Horne (c.1761-c.1841) was the son of an Antiguan barrister and planter and the nephew of Nathaniel Gilbert (c.1721-1774) the pioneer of West Indian Methodism. Horne entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1784 and was ordained into the Anglican ministry a short time after on John Wesley's recommendation. In 1786 he succeeded to the curacy at John Fletcher's old parish of Madeley, but retained his connection with Methodism and was appointed Superintendent of the new Wolverhampton circuit in 1787. In 1792 Horne became chaplain of Sierra Leone in West Africa where he joined his second cousin Nathaniel Gilbert junior. He was however unable to adapt to the climate and returned to England in 1793 and published his Letters on Missions a year later. Horne served as Vicar of Olney from 1796 to 1799 and then succeeded the evangelical minister David Simpson at Christ Church Macclesfield. Horne enjoyed a close friendship with Jabez Bunting but this turned to coldness on both sides which culminated in Horne's final break with Methodism in 1809. He later served Anglican parishes in Essex, Cornwall and Salford. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)