Letter

Scope and Content

From William Sleep in Wellington [the Sleeps were stationed in Wellington in 1819 and 1820] to Mary Tooth in Madeley. Next Sunday, they are expecting Mr [Abraham] Watmough169 to preach sermons for the benefit of the Sunday school at Coal Pit Bank Chapel – services to begin at 10.30, 12.30 and 6 pm. [Abraham Watmough was stationed in Wellington in 1819 and 1820] The Sunday school attendance has increased to almost 500 children.

Catherine sends her best wishes. They were sorry to hear that Tooth has been unwell and hope that she has now recovered

[Annotated by Tooth – ‘Answered June 13th 1820’]

Notes

  • Abraham Watmough (1787-1863) was born in Rochdale, Lancashire. He was converted at the age of seventeen by a sermon of the Wesleyan minister Alexander Suter and entered the itinerancy in 1811. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and the Isle of Man until superannuation due to failing health in 1856. He spent his final years in St Helens, Lancashire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1863 and Hill's Arrangement 1862.
  • Henry Stormont (fl.1820-1838) was the son of John Stormont of Madeley. Henry appears to have lived for a time in Leeds, but spent much of his life in the Midlands working as a teacher. He was a class member and friend and correspondent of Mary Tooth. Henry’s wife Caroline, the former Miss Guy, was the daughter of Joseph Guy and was also a member of the society. Henry and Caroline were married on 30 October 1822 at St Phillips Anglican Church in Birmingham. She died aged 41 at Worcester in October 1836 (FL/6/12/9). The couple had at least one son Henry junior, christened on 4th June 1829 at Redditch Wesleyan chapel. Henry appears to have re-married on 14th June 1838 to Hannah Bennett in Kidderminster. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection (FL/6/12) and International Genealogical Index 176 & 8 [See note 173]
  • Jonathan Edmondson (1766-1842) was converted at an early age and graduated M. A. with the idea of ordination into the Church of England. A member of a Methodist Society, he entered the itinerancy in 1786 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty years until ill health forced him into retirement. He was Secretary of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 1814-15 and President of Conference in 1818. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.867-868
  • Sarah Guy (1758-1835) was the wife of Joseph Guy of Birmingham, who is described in the Methodist Magazine as the ‘author of the school publications’. Originally from Tewkesbury, she was one of the earliest Methodists in that town and was converted under the ministry of Adam Clarke (1762-1832). She died at Worcester on 28th September 1835. Her daughter Caroline (d.1836) was married to the lay Methodist Henry Stormont. Source: Methodist Magazine 1835, 966 and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MAM FL/6/12: MARC)
  • George Perks (1752-1833) was born at Higford in Shropshire, the son of a wheelwright. He trained in Birmingham as a cabinet-maker and was married in 1779 to Elizabeth Claverley. The couple moved to Madeley soon after. He was converted under the influence of John Fletcher and began to attend Methodist class meetings under the leadership of Mary Fletcher. Perks remained active in Methodism for the remainder of his life, serving as a class leader and as Secretary to the Madeley Benevolent Society. Source: Methodist Magazine 1835, 895-900.

Note

Notes

  • Abraham Watmough (1787-1863) was born in Rochdale, Lancashire. He was converted at the age of seventeen by a sermon of the Wesleyan minister Alexander Suter and entered the itinerancy in 1811. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and the Isle of Man until superannuation due to failing health in 1856. He spent his final years in St Helens, Lancashire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1863 and Hill's Arrangement 1862.
  • Henry Stormont (fl.1820-1838) was the son of John Stormont of Madeley. Henry appears to have lived for a time in Leeds, but spent much of his life in the Midlands working as a teacher. He was a class member and friend and correspondent of Mary Tooth. Henry’s wife Caroline, the former Miss Guy, was the daughter of Joseph Guy and was also a member of the society. Henry and Caroline were married on 30 October 1822 at St Phillips Anglican Church in Birmingham. She died aged 41 at Worcester in October 1836 (FL/6/12/9). The couple had at least one son Henry junior, christened on 4th June 1829 at Redditch Wesleyan chapel. Henry appears to have re-married on 14th June 1838 to Hannah Bennett in Kidderminster. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection (FL/6/12) and International Genealogical Index 176 & 8 [See note 173]
  • Jonathan Edmondson (1766-1842) was converted at an early age and graduated M. A. with the idea of ordination into the Church of England. A member of a Methodist Society, he entered the itinerancy in 1786 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty years until ill health forced him into retirement. He was Secretary of the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society 1814-15 and President of Conference in 1818. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.867-868
  • Sarah Guy (1758-1835) was the wife of Joseph Guy of Birmingham, who is described in the Methodist Magazine as the ‘author of the school publications’. Originally from Tewkesbury, she was one of the earliest Methodists in that town and was converted under the ministry of Adam Clarke (1762-1832). She died at Worcester on 28th September 1835. Her daughter Caroline (d.1836) was married to the lay Methodist Henry Stormont. Source: Methodist Magazine 1835, 966 and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MAM FL/6/12: MARC)
  • George Perks (1752-1833) was born at Higford in Shropshire, the son of a wheelwright. He trained in Birmingham as a cabinet-maker and was married in 1779 to Elizabeth Claverley. The couple moved to Madeley soon after. He was converted under the influence of John Fletcher and began to attend Methodist class meetings under the leadership of Mary Fletcher. Perks remained active in Methodism for the remainder of his life, serving as a class leader and as Secretary to the Madeley Benevolent Society. Source: Methodist Magazine 1835, 895-900.