Letter

Scope and Content

From Mary Davies [in Worcester?]. She has taken the liberty to send these few lines, as Tooth had given her permission to write. Her greatest desire would be to be at Madeley with Tooth and [Mary] Fletcher and she often peruses in private Tooth's kind letter 'and stricly adhere to your kind admonition…' Her regards should be passed to dear [Mary] Fletcher. Davies often wishes that she could be at Madeley to attend her lectures.

Her parents send their regards and gratitude for the kindness shown to Davies.

Their congregation has much increased since [James M.] Byron came here -he is a fine man.

Davies would be very grateful fora few lines from Tooth, especially as she is unable to visit Madeley as often as she would wish. Mrs and Miss Knapp send their regards.

From Mary Tooth to Mary Davies

Davies's letter gave Tooth real pleasure. It will always be pleasing to hear of Davies's prosperity both spiritually and temporally, the former however being much more significant than the latter. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

About the time she received Davies's letter, it was about the time of year when she visits Coalport and the Park (now T. M.). A few days before going to Coalport, she came across the account of a converted negro and it was the source of much blessing to her when she read it herself at home. She was however reluctant to take it to Coalport on account its length, for fear that [in reading it out aloud] she would 'weary' the people. Tooth found it so powerful that she eventually took it and read it out. Instead of being wearied, the people said that they wished it had been twice the length and several came the following Sunday and asked her to read it again at T. M., which she did and more attended than could actually hear her voice. To accommodate those who could not hear, she therefore read it a third time at Mrs Fletcher's Room at Madeley - this place was also crowded. Many of the hearers said that nothing had ever sent them home praying as much as the that account of the negro. Tooth has enclosed it, so that it might be a source of blessing to Davies's soul and any who she might lend it to.

'I hope your father & mother constantly attend preaching. I wish them to think much on the shortage of time & the length of eternity…may may they be wise to consider their latter end…'

Dear [Mary] Fletcher was confined to the house during the Winter but has been out and about again for more than a month, despite the severity of the weather - it is dangerous for her but when she has a little strength she uses it. 'Indeed every time she can get out we have a precious opportunity, the Lord has been much with us in all our assembling together…the little flock at Coal- [Coalbrookdale] just go on well in their course…poor old Mrs Harrington[?], I dare say you have heard, was taken some time ago, I doubt not to God. She remembered you to the last…we have had many sick about us lately which has been our principal cause of my delaying to write to you, I have been so taking up with visiting them. I should this evening have been out had not some heavy rain detained me at home'.

Despite the long silence, Davies has not been forgotten. Fletcher and Tooth's sister [Rosamund] join in sending their love.

Note

  • James M. Byron (1760-1827) was born in Ireland. He was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1785. His active circuit ministry of thirty-eight years was spent in England, mainly in the West. After superannuation he settled in Frome. Source: Minutes of Conference 1828 and Hill's Arrangement 1819

Note

Note

  • James M. Byron (1760-1827) was born in Ireland. He was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1785. His active circuit ministry of thirty-eight years was spent in England, mainly in the West. After superannuation he settled in Frome. Source: Minutes of Conference 1828 and Hill's Arrangement 1819