Letter

Scope and Content

From Rosamund Tooth in Madeley to [Mrs Legge]. Legge's kind letter was very welcome. She had intended answering it before now and was amazed to discover that three months have passed since it arrived.

Rosamund hopes that Mr Legge will not suffer as much with the gout this winter, especially as he has moved to an 'inland station'. They were very upset to read in the paper of the fatal accident suffered by Mr Lipscombe of the Marine Hotel.

They had the missionary meetings in April - Rosamund attended the gatherings in Madeley Wood, Brosely and Shifnall and was much gratified.

Rosamund certainly remembers Miss Stone and was pleased to hear that she has settled 'to her mind and I hope their union will prove a comfortable one'.

Since they met last, Rosamund has had the wooden palisades in front of the house changed to iron ones and they have now acquired a nice little gig - Mary [Tooth] has become an excellent driver. They went to Wellington last Thursday week and are to go to Bridgnorth next Thursday. They hope that the Legges will favour Madeley with a visit this summer. They are expecting visitors towards the latter end of this month - two widow ladies out of Norfolk [possibly Sarah Boyce and Martha Gregson - see their letters in the Fletcher-Tooth collection]. As Mary and Rosamund do not know how long their Norfolk visitors will remain, they cannot arrange a visit to the Legges.

Mary sends her love. It would be wonderful to see the Legges in Madeley especially at this time of the year.

Mrs Williams is in Worcester on a visit to her father, who has not been well. [Richard] Williams has lately nearly lost his hearing. Reference is made to Miss Haslewood and Mr Good.

Notes

  • Richard Williams (d.1832) was a brazier in Ludlow, Shropshire. Despite opposition he was a member of the Methodist society in Ludlow for many years and served as a chapel trustee at Madeley Wood from 1807. Nevertheless he was not fully converted until a short time before his death which occurred in June 1832. Williams had been acquainted with the prominent female evangelists Mary Fletcher and Mary Tooth. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832
  • Martha Gregson (d.1839) was the eldest daughter of Revd. John Twells, Anglican vicar of Cawston with Rockland in Norfolk. She was converted under Methodist influence and became deeply involved in the Methodist cause in her native county as a preacher and promoter of schools and chapels. Gregson was a close friend of the noted female preacher Sarah Boyce and during the last period of her life the two shared a house and exercised what was effectively a joint ministry. Her husband was Revd. W. Gregson of Saham-Toney in Norfolk. Despite his Anglican orders he appears to have been sympathetic to her activities. Source: Methodist Magazine 1841,326-327
  • Sarah Boyce [nee Mallet] (c.1764-c.1843) was converted under Methodist influence at the age of seventeen and began to preach early in 1786. She worked chiefly in East Anglia but also travelled elsewhere. She accompanied John Wesley during a visit to Norwich and corresponded with him several times. Boyce was subject to trances and felt under a strong conviction to preach the word of God. Despite the restrictions placed on women preachers after Wesley's death, correspondence preserved in the Methodist Archives proves that she was openly preaching, often in Methodist chapels, to within a few years of her death. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995) and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MARC)

Note

Notes

  • Richard Williams (d.1832) was a brazier in Ludlow, Shropshire. Despite opposition he was a member of the Methodist society in Ludlow for many years and served as a chapel trustee at Madeley Wood from 1807. Nevertheless he was not fully converted until a short time before his death which occurred in June 1832. Williams had been acquainted with the prominent female evangelists Mary Fletcher and Mary Tooth. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832
  • Martha Gregson (d.1839) was the eldest daughter of Revd. John Twells, Anglican vicar of Cawston with Rockland in Norfolk. She was converted under Methodist influence and became deeply involved in the Methodist cause in her native county as a preacher and promoter of schools and chapels. Gregson was a close friend of the noted female preacher Sarah Boyce and during the last period of her life the two shared a house and exercised what was effectively a joint ministry. Her husband was Revd. W. Gregson of Saham-Toney in Norfolk. Despite his Anglican orders he appears to have been sympathetic to her activities. Source: Methodist Magazine 1841,326-327
  • Sarah Boyce [nee Mallet] (c.1764-c.1843) was converted under Methodist influence at the age of seventeen and began to preach early in 1786. She worked chiefly in East Anglia but also travelled elsewhere. She accompanied John Wesley during a visit to Norwich and corresponded with him several times. Boyce was subject to trances and felt under a strong conviction to preach the word of God. Despite the restrictions placed on women preachers after Wesley's death, correspondence preserved in the Methodist Archives proves that she was openly preaching, often in Methodist chapels, to within a few years of her death. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995) and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MARC)