Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 MAM/FL/6/2/23
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 MAM/FL/6/2/23
  • Dates of Creation
      Saturday evening [1813/14]

Scope and Content

From John Radford in Coalford to Mary Tooth. He has enclosed four notes for her use, as she thinks proper – he would be grateful if she could decide a Sunday that would be convenient for her to take Nabb and Coalpit Bank. She should inform Radford of her decision on Monday so that he can let the congregations know.

Radford has received the annual collection from Mr Smith but it slipped his memory to enquire whether Tooth had collected it from some of her class.

He would be grateful if Tooth could inform her people at Coalport that Mr [David] Deakin will issue [class] tickets next time.

This evening Radford visited the poor woman mentioned by Tooth – she has been deranged but is now somewhat better and is still desirous of seeing Tooth. Her house is near Brosely [unreadable name], on the Coalford side beside what is called ‘Jacks Fields Rails.’ She did not appear to have much concern for her soul and observed that she had “done no harm.” Radford conversed, read and prayed with her ‘but was fearful of her being outrageous, but it was not so.’

His best wishes should be passed to [Mary] Fletcher

Notes

  • William Dawson (1773-1841) was born in Garforth, Yorkshire, the son of a steward to a colliery manager. He had an Anglican background and was converted duing a communion service in 1791. Feeling a call to preach, he attached himself to the Methodists and became a local preacher in 1801. A year later Dawson was accepted for the itinerancy but was forced to decline because of lack of financial support for his dependents. Dawson was a talented preacher who was much in demand. He addressed Methodist meetings across the country and supported the Conference in the various disputes that affected the movement. In 1838 funds were raised to allow him to leave his farm and travel on a full-time basis, preaching mainly in support of foreign missions. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995) 299 Radford is here referring to Tooth preaching at certain localities in the Shrewsbury circuit. It is interesting that he was effectively defying Conference as female preaching had been effectively banned by the 1803 Conference except in very restricted circumstances.
  • David Deakin (fl.1797-1862) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1797 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation in 1829. He retired to Leicester and continued to be listed by Hills Arrangement until 1862 after which his name disappears from the record. It had not occurred for several years previously in the Minutes of Conference and no obituary has yet been found. Source: Hills Arrangement 1862

Note

Notes

  • William Dawson (1773-1841) was born in Garforth, Yorkshire, the son of a steward to a colliery manager. He had an Anglican background and was converted duing a communion service in 1791. Feeling a call to preach, he attached himself to the Methodists and became a local preacher in 1801. A year later Dawson was accepted for the itinerancy but was forced to decline because of lack of financial support for his dependents. Dawson was a talented preacher who was much in demand. He addressed Methodist meetings across the country and supported the Conference in the various disputes that affected the movement. In 1838 funds were raised to allow him to leave his farm and travel on a full-time basis, preaching mainly in support of foreign missions. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995) 299 Radford is here referring to Tooth preaching at certain localities in the Shrewsbury circuit. It is interesting that he was effectively defying Conference as female preaching had been effectively banned by the 1803 Conference except in very restricted circumstances.
  • David Deakin (fl.1797-1862) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1797 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation in 1829. He retired to Leicester and continued to be listed by Hills Arrangement until 1862 after which his name disappears from the record. It had not occurred for several years previously in the Minutes of Conference and no obituary has yet been found. Source: Hills Arrangement 1862