Letter

Scope and Content

From [John] Crosby [signature erased] in Keighley, to [Mr Kingston]. He would like to give an account of the good work which is being carried on in these parts. From their first entering the circuit there was every reason to hope that there would be a revival especially at Yeadon - every time they went there, their hopes were raised and on January 27 that hope was realised. 'Small companies began to meet together for prayer and several were brought into liberty, their houses soon became too small to contain them that [unreadable word] to them the vestry was made choice of as more convenient but that also being too small they took possession of the preaching house when from 3 to 400 people attended the prayer meetings, many were in great distress of mind and I think near 40 found peace that week, the work went on. Numbers more were struck with deep conviction in their houses while at their ordinary work, whose concern for salvation was such that persons were sent for to pray with them. Their neighbours hearing the now well-known sound of either joy or sorrow, flocked in and soon filled the houses . These they continued till the noon of day when the intended dinner was found either removed into a comer or standing by the fire - on these occasions some continued on their knees 5 or 6 hours together while others were pleading at the throne of grace on their behalf till God shed abroad his love in their hearts…some fled from those scenes of confusion as they were pleased to call them, to their work at a distance but when there God found -them out, they were seized with such horror of mind that they threw down their tools and returned to their brethren in distress…The alarm was become general and tho, not every house, yet the greatest part became houses of prayer. The day being too short they borrowed the night and continued their prayer meeting in the chapel until 12 sometimes 2 or 3 o'clock in the morning and even then tho dismissed from the chapel, they gathered together in smacompanies and continued their supplications…It is natural to suppose that in such a work there would be some irregularities, one instance of which I give you, a number who were employed at a mill would hold a prayer meeting at the noon hour, which was readily begun but not so easily given over, for they prayed until night, a conduct by no means justifiable, yet this gave less offence than might have been expected. The proprietor looked in but returned saying I dare not disturb them for God is among them. At their love feast which was held in a field, I suppose 5 or 6000 attended. I was there the 13 inst and stayed there a day or two to admit new members when I received upon trial 353, most of whom had found peace. 154 were admitted by my coleagues, 507 in the Yeadon society only. We have just joined and admitted on trial this quarter 656, most of whom profess to have found pardon…'

Crosby has never seen such a week before - there seemed to be so much of God and so little of man, he has never known such a great revival in so small a place or one where it ran so deep in such a short time. The people in general were so awed by what was happening that when the Yeadon huntsman sounded his horn, it was in vain for not a single person followed the sound.

From Anne Tripp to Mary Fletcher.

Although she has not time to answer Fletcher's two kind letters, she thought that Fletcher would be interested to receive a little account of the work at Yeadon - much more might have been added and presumably will be, when it is published.

Tripp has been constantly busy during the conference.

Dear Mrs Mortimer intends visiting Madeley in about a fortnight and Tripp will, if possible, send a letter with her.

Note

  • John Crosby (1754-1816) was born in Whitby, Yorkshire. He was converted at the age of 21 through the ministry of an evangelical clergyman at Pickering. Crosby entered the itinerancy in 1783 and served circuits in England and Scotland until superannuation in 1811 to Bradford, Yorkshire. He spent the last two years of his life as a supernumary in Bristol. While stationed in the Keighley circuit ((1805-07), Crosby witnessed and contributed to the great revival of 1806 which took place in Yeadon. Source: Minutes of Conference 1816, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers… 1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick and Fletcher-Tooth collection at the MARC

Note

Note

  • John Crosby (1754-1816) was born in Whitby, Yorkshire. He was converted at the age of 21 through the ministry of an evangelical clergyman at Pickering. Crosby entered the itinerancy in 1783 and served circuits in England and Scotland until superannuation in 1811 to Bradford, Yorkshire. He spent the last two years of his life as a supernumary in Bristol. While stationed in the Keighley circuit ((1805-07), Crosby witnessed and contributed to the great revival of 1806 which took place in Yeadon. Source: Minutes of Conference 1816, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers… 1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick and Fletcher-Tooth collection at the MARC