Letter

Scope and Content

From Liverpool to Mary Fletcher. In reply to Fletcher's kind letter, Hill can only reply that it was her understanding from Mr W that it was Fletcher's wish 'to have published at once, only, the account which he lent me to read which brings our revered friends life down to the year 89 and that only in an imperfect way, many most interesting particulars being omitted….such as the visit to Dublin etc. It seems to me that she intended the whole for publication, & that it should be brought down to the very last year of her life & include the account of her death & interment'. Anything less would be unsatisfactory.

Was it her wish that profits from the sale of the book, be allocated to a particular purpose? If she meant it for the Book Room, the assistant editor there [James] MacDonald would certainly aim at making the book as large and as full as possible, as would all the preachers in their respective circuits, but as Fletcher has already consulted [Henry] Moore, he will no doubt give her the best advice possible and she can certainly rely on his judgement. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Hill would be very glad to hear again from Fletcher when she has heard from Moore and framed her own response.

Hill's dear husband [Thomas] and sister [Ann Loxdale] join in sending their love.

Notes

  • Sarah Hill (1761-1848) was the daughter of Joseph Loxdale of Shrewsbury. She moved to Liverpool after her marriage to Revd. Thomas Hill (ordained into the Anglican ministry in about 1805) and was a prominent member of the Methodist Society. She was also a close friend and correspondent of John and Mary Fletcher of Madeley as well as several Wesleyan ministers. She had been converted to Methodism at a young age despite some family opposition and was a generous giver to Methodist causes. She served as a class leader until a short time before her death which was a result of influenza. Hill was resident for much of her adult life at Clarence Street in Liverpool. Her sister Ann (1756-1812) was also a devout Methodist and the second wife of Dr Thomas Coke. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection and Methodist Magazine 1848, p.222
  • James McDonald (1761-1833) was born near Enniskillen in Ireland. He began to preach at the age of nineteen and in 1784 was called by John Wesley to enter the itinerancy. After eleven years in Ireland, he moved to England and worked as a circuit minister until he suffered a stroke in 1831 from which he never recovered. Source: Minutes of Conference 1834

Note

Notes

  • Sarah Hill (1761-1848) was the daughter of Joseph Loxdale of Shrewsbury. She moved to Liverpool after her marriage to Revd. Thomas Hill (ordained into the Anglican ministry in about 1805) and was a prominent member of the Methodist Society. She was also a close friend and correspondent of John and Mary Fletcher of Madeley as well as several Wesleyan ministers. She had been converted to Methodism at a young age despite some family opposition and was a generous giver to Methodist causes. She served as a class leader until a short time before her death which was a result of influenza. Hill was resident for much of her adult life at Clarence Street in Liverpool. Her sister Ann (1756-1812) was also a devout Methodist and the second wife of Dr Thomas Coke. Source: Fletcher-Tooth collection and Methodist Magazine 1848, p.222
  • James McDonald (1761-1833) was born near Enniskillen in Ireland. He began to preach at the age of nineteen and in 1784 was called by John Wesley to enter the itinerancy. After eleven years in Ireland, he moved to England and worked as a circuit minister until he suffered a stroke in 1831 from which he never recovered. Source: Minutes of Conference 1834