Letter

Scope and Content

From [Saham Toney]. The auction [of Gregson's possessions] is set for June 11. A few days after that, Gregson is to move to Norwich. [Sarah] Boyce is to remain in Saham quite close to the chapel, which is a great comfort to her.

The [Wesleyan] Methodist membership continues to increase at Saham although the Ranters [Primitive Methodists] are trying hard to attract people away - they are now acquiring a chapel.

A few days will suffice for her to put her things in order in Norwich - her sister [Ann Francis] has spent some weeks in the house and Gregson has already sent a good part of the furniture. Sea air has been recommended to her and she intends to go [to the coast] for a few days as soon as she can. It would be wonderful if Tooth could join her. Tooth should write soon to let her know her intentions. Her sister Ann [Francis] and brother-in-law Henry would be pleased to have Tooth stay. 'I hope they [Ann and Henry] will become serious, they have good desires, and I trust will prove in earnest'.

Gregson has had Mrs Pattison staying with her - she is a very good friend and is the wife of the Methodist minister [Richard Pattison] from Oakham in Rutlandshire. Pattison 'is a deeply pious, sensible woman, a great talent for speaking to the people. In the idea that I have formed of Mrs [Mary] Fletcher, she comes nearly up to her. I should much like you to see her - many of her people were brought into the liberty of sanctification whilst she was in this neighbourhood. Her name will long be remembered with gratitude'.

Gregson has not let her house [in Saham] at present, but is expecting someone to come and have a look at it tomorrow. Hopefully, it will be a 'serious person'. That would certainly indicate that everything was working at the right time. Indeed, she feels no doubt that her leaving Saham is in accordance with God's will.

For a short time, there was a lot of sickness in the house - Boyce, Mrs Pattison and Gregson herself, but the Lord soon restored them.

Sarah Boyce to Tooth

Spiritual matters are discussed.

Gregson and Boyce will soon be parted. It will be a painful change, but Boyce could not be parted from her little flock.

They returned from Lynn last night. 'The Devil's kingdom is falling there and Christ's is rising…'

Notes

  • Richard Pattison (1769-1839) was born in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, into a family of dissenters. His father died when he was aged eight and he was raised by his mother. Pattison started at frequent the local Methodist chapel at the age of fifteen for the purpose of disturbing the congregation, but was converted by a sermon preached by the Wesleyan minister Jonathan Coussins. He became a member of a Methodist class and a local preacher before offering himself for the overseas mission in 1791. Pattison was appointed to the West Indies and served there for seven years. Declining health caused by a liver complaint forced his return home in 1798. He was appointed to serve first in Nottingham and then on the island of Jersey. Patterson married in August 1799 and immediately offered to return to the West Indies with his new bride [christian name unknown]. The couple arrived safely in Barbados, after enduring a sea battle with a Spanish privateer. Patterson discovered that a false report of his death has preceded him and his funeral sermon had actually been preached two weeks before. Pattison went on to serve on several islands namely Tortilla, Antigua and Barbados. He was also appointed to Dominica in 1804 and arrived outside the main harbour just as a French fleet came into sight. His ship managed to escape and he went on to Barbados where he spent the last two years of his overseas ministry. He returned home in 1806 and served in a number of English circuits until superannuation in 1835. He retired to Cheetham Hill in Manchester where he died after a short illness on December 29 1839. At the time of Richard's death, his widow was still alive and the couple had at least one daughter and probably three sons whose names are recorded in the Kingswood School registers as John Gilbert (subsequently a warehouseman in Manchester), Theophilus (also a warehouseman in Manchester) and Richard who became a journalist. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840, History of Kingswood School by Three Old Boys (1898), p.164, Hill's Arrangement 1838 and Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.177-191
  • Mrs Pattison (fl.1800-1842) was the wife of the Wesleyan missionary Richard Pattison. Her Christian name and details of her early life are unknown. She married Pattison in August 1799 on the island of Jersey and the couple left soon after to take up an appointment in the West Indies. On their outward voyage, they narrowly escaped capture by a Spanish privateer. Richard Pattison served on several West Indian islands namely Tortilla, Antigua and Barbados. He was also appointed to Dominica in 1804 and the couple's ship arrived outside the main harbour just as a French fleet came into sight. Their ship managed to escape and continued to Barbados where the couple spent the last two years of their overseas ministry. The Pattisons returned home in 1806 and served in a number of English circuits until superannuation in 1835. They retired to Cheetham Hill in Manchester where Richard died after a short illness on December 29 1839. His widow wrote a memoir of his life for the Methodist Magazine, which was printed in 1842. At that time, she was still living in Cheetham Hill, but disappears from Methodist sources thereafter. At the time of Richard's death, the couple had at least one daughter and probably three sons whose names are recorded in the Kingswood School registers as John Gilbert and Theophilus (both subsequently warehousemen in Manchester) and Richard who became a journalist. Mrs Pattison was a close friend of the female evangelists Martha Gregson and Sarah Boyce. She visited them in Norfolk in 1833 and it is evident from the primary sources that she exercised a public ministry in her own right which may have included preaching. Gregson described her as 'a deeply pious, sensible woman, [with] a great talent for speaking to the people…many of her people were brought into the liberty of sanctification whilst she was in this neighbourhood'. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840, History of Kingswood School by Three Old Boys (1898), p.164, Hill's Arrangement 1838, Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.177-191 and Fletcher-Tooth collection.

Note

Notes

  • Richard Pattison (1769-1839) was born in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, into a family of dissenters. His father died when he was aged eight and he was raised by his mother. Pattison started at frequent the local Methodist chapel at the age of fifteen for the purpose of disturbing the congregation, but was converted by a sermon preached by the Wesleyan minister Jonathan Coussins. He became a member of a Methodist class and a local preacher before offering himself for the overseas mission in 1791. Pattison was appointed to the West Indies and served there for seven years. Declining health caused by a liver complaint forced his return home in 1798. He was appointed to serve first in Nottingham and then on the island of Jersey. Patterson married in August 1799 and immediately offered to return to the West Indies with his new bride [christian name unknown]. The couple arrived safely in Barbados, after enduring a sea battle with a Spanish privateer. Patterson discovered that a false report of his death has preceded him and his funeral sermon had actually been preached two weeks before. Pattison went on to serve on several islands namely Tortilla, Antigua and Barbados. He was also appointed to Dominica in 1804 and arrived outside the main harbour just as a French fleet came into sight. His ship managed to escape and he went on to Barbados where he spent the last two years of his overseas ministry. He returned home in 1806 and served in a number of English circuits until superannuation in 1835. He retired to Cheetham Hill in Manchester where he died after a short illness on December 29 1839. At the time of Richard's death, his widow was still alive and the couple had at least one daughter and probably three sons whose names are recorded in the Kingswood School registers as John Gilbert (subsequently a warehouseman in Manchester), Theophilus (also a warehouseman in Manchester) and Richard who became a journalist. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840, History of Kingswood School by Three Old Boys (1898), p.164, Hill's Arrangement 1838 and Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.177-191
  • Mrs Pattison (fl.1800-1842) was the wife of the Wesleyan missionary Richard Pattison. Her Christian name and details of her early life are unknown. She married Pattison in August 1799 on the island of Jersey and the couple left soon after to take up an appointment in the West Indies. On their outward voyage, they narrowly escaped capture by a Spanish privateer. Richard Pattison served on several West Indian islands namely Tortilla, Antigua and Barbados. He was also appointed to Dominica in 1804 and the couple's ship arrived outside the main harbour just as a French fleet came into sight. Their ship managed to escape and continued to Barbados where the couple spent the last two years of their overseas ministry. The Pattisons returned home in 1806 and served in a number of English circuits until superannuation in 1835. They retired to Cheetham Hill in Manchester where Richard died after a short illness on December 29 1839. His widow wrote a memoir of his life for the Methodist Magazine, which was printed in 1842. At that time, she was still living in Cheetham Hill, but disappears from Methodist sources thereafter. At the time of Richard's death, the couple had at least one daughter and probably three sons whose names are recorded in the Kingswood School registers as John Gilbert and Theophilus (both subsequently warehousemen in Manchester) and Richard who became a journalist. Mrs Pattison was a close friend of the female evangelists Martha Gregson and Sarah Boyce. She visited them in Norfolk in 1833 and it is evident from the primary sources that she exercised a public ministry in her own right which may have included preaching. Gregson described her as 'a deeply pious, sensible woman, [with] a great talent for speaking to the people…many of her people were brought into the liberty of sanctification whilst she was in this neighbourhood'. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840, History of Kingswood School by Three Old Boys (1898), p.164, Hill's Arrangement 1838, Methodist Magazine 1842, pp.177-191 and Fletcher-Tooth collection.