Letter

Scope and Content

From George Clark in London, to Madeley. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail, with particular regard to the death of John Fletcher.

The account [of John Fletcher's death] which Fletcher sent to him, has been read in all the 'preaching places' and been a blessing to many, especially to [Elizabeth] wife of [Richard] Mcauley, who heard it on Sunday and died, very happy, in childbirth the following Friday. Large numbers of people want to hear the account - 'and Mr [John] Wesley is not willing to print it but in the [Arminian] Magazine, so the poor will be deprived of the blessing'.

Clark asks that Fletcher remember him and his daughter Mrs Addy in her prayers. Addy is pregnant and is so weak and 'low' that her mother fears that she will not live to the end of her term, which is four months. Clark's own distress is often very great - spiritual matters are discussed.

In a postscript, he adds that his wife [Adylena] joins in sending love to Fletcher and to [Sarah] Lawrance. Mrs Burgess likewise joins in sending love.

Notes

  • Richard Macaulay (1747-86) and his wife Elizabeth (1751-85) are recorded as having been members of the society at London's City Road Chapel. They were resident close by at Norton Folgate. Elizabeth died in childbirth. The family memorial in the chapel lists many members of the same family who were active in Methodist affairs well into the 19th century. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), p.467
  • Sarah Lawrance (1756-1800) was the niece of John Wesley's housekeeper Sarah Ryan, one of a circle of female Methodists which included Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Sarah Crosby. Lawrance was raised from a very early age in the orphanage established by Bosanquet-Fletcher, a women with whom she enjoyed virtually a mother-daughter relationship. She was effectively converted by the age of ten and was accepted into the Leeds Methodist Society at the age of eighteen. A year later she was confirmed into the Church of England. Lawrance spent much of her life within the Bosanquet-Fletcher household where she played a very active role in the work of the Methodist Societies. She had a particular gift for working with children and was accustomed to exhort and pray in public. Lawrance enjoyed a considerable reputation for saintliness of character. Source: Methodist Magazine 1803, pp.160-167, and unpublished Account of Sarah Lawrance by Mary Bosanquet- Fletcher in the Fletcher-Tooth collection, Methodist Archives and Research Centre

Note

Notes

  • Richard Macaulay (1747-86) and his wife Elizabeth (1751-85) are recorded as having been members of the society at London's City Road Chapel. They were resident close by at Norton Folgate. Elizabeth died in childbirth. The family memorial in the chapel lists many members of the same family who were active in Methodist affairs well into the 19th century. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), p.467
  • Sarah Lawrance (1756-1800) was the niece of John Wesley's housekeeper Sarah Ryan, one of a circle of female Methodists which included Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Sarah Crosby. Lawrance was raised from a very early age in the orphanage established by Bosanquet-Fletcher, a women with whom she enjoyed virtually a mother-daughter relationship. She was effectively converted by the age of ten and was accepted into the Leeds Methodist Society at the age of eighteen. A year later she was confirmed into the Church of England. Lawrance spent much of her life within the Bosanquet-Fletcher household where she played a very active role in the work of the Methodist Societies. She had a particular gift for working with children and was accustomed to exhort and pray in public. Lawrance enjoyed a considerable reputation for saintliness of character. Source: Methodist Magazine 1803, pp.160-167, and unpublished Account of Sarah Lawrance by Mary Bosanquet- Fletcher in the Fletcher-Tooth collection, Methodist Archives and Research Centre