Letter

Scope and Content

From Birmingham to [Mary] Tooth. Tooth’s kind letter was delivered by Mr Beesley last Saturday. She would have responded immediately but delayed until the time that Tooth would be receiving the ‘work’ [Life of Mary Fletcher]. [Henry] has made as much progress as possible by going to the printer, who promised that the copies would be sent the latter end of this week. Hopefully, Tooth will have received them by this time. [Henry] was determined that Tooth receive the first copies that were ‘in boards’ [ie. bound].

Tooth was mistook with regard to what Moore said with regard to the other edition. [One volume edition of Henry Moore’s The Life of Mary Fletcher (see MAM/FL/5/5/2).] [Henry] had no notion of Tooth selling any copies, but he does with her to let Mr [John] Squarebridge know that if he wanted any copies of that edition to sell, he should write to [Henry] for them. Mr [Thomas] Blanshard has left a number of copies here for that very reason but there are none to give away. If Squarebrridge wants any copies of the second volume, he must write to London for them.

The Moores were very pleased to hear that Squarebridge is well-liked by the people [Squarebridge served as the Superintendent of the Brosely circuit, which included Madeley, between 1816 and 1820.] ‘and that your mind is relieved from the perplexity you have had with those before him, the Lord has provided in this thing also, and we praise him for it. [This may be an oblique reference to Squarebridge accepting the validity of Tooth’s ministry, with particular regard to preaching. At different times, various Methodist ministers tried to place obstacles in her path, while others were more supportive.] What you tell us of Mr Mortimer, does not lessen our surprise…our wonderment, we cannot at all perceive any suitableness for such an undertaking, nor from which his views can arise, and that Mrs [Mortimer] should sanction, and concur in it, is still more inexplicable. The effects it has in Madeley is certainly to be expected and I fear it will be the resullt, wherever it is spoken of, should it really take place, and as you are determined not again to interfere in chusing another curate, you must be the more importunate in prayer that the Lord may direct to one whom He will use to the furtherance of His own work, yet it seems the decision is so far made, that the Church people and Methodists will not be one.’

Moore does not know what success [Gideon] Ouseley had at Madeley, ‘but I rather think but little. He is gone from hence around the adjacent towns, as he could not continue here, two sermons have been taken up by sermons for the Benevolent [Fund], when about 4 pounds was got more than last year, and there is certainly much less distress…yet there are many very affecting cases, and the poor we have always with us. Next Sunday we expect Mr Cousins for the relief of a chapel, [Michael Cousin was Superintendent of the Evesham circuit when this letter was written. Information provided by Mr. John Lenton.] allowed in, by Conference, so that we fear Mr Ouseley will come off but short.’ [This comment indicates that Conference restricted the appearance of ‘special evangelists’, so as not to have too many preaching to raise funds in the one area. ]

Notes

  • John Squarebridge (1783-1844) was born in Whitehaven, Cumberland. He was converted at the age of seventeen under the ministry of Rev. E. Millier and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1806. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and the Isle of Man until superannuation due to ill health in 1839. He spent his last years in Wellington, Shropshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1845 and Hilll’s Arrangement 1841.
  • Thomas Blanshard (b.c.1765-1824) entered the Methodist ministry in 1795 and served as a circuit minister in England and Wales until 1808 when he was appointed Book Steward. He served in that position for fifteen years after which he returned to the active ministry despite declining health. He died on February 20th 1824 after an illness lasting several months. Source: Arminian Magazine 1824, pp.645-646 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Michael Cousin (1782-1852) was born at Haworth in Yorkshire. He was converted under Methodist influence and joined the society in 1802. He was accepted as an itinerant by the Conference of 1804 and worked as a circuit minister until superannuation to Halifax circuit in 1846. Cousin had been suffering from heart disease for some time before his death on November 6 1852. Source: Minutes of Conference 1853.

Note

Notes

  • John Squarebridge (1783-1844) was born in Whitehaven, Cumberland. He was converted at the age of seventeen under the ministry of Rev. E. Millier and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1806. His active circuit ministry was exercised in England and the Isle of Man until superannuation due to ill health in 1839. He spent his last years in Wellington, Shropshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1845 and Hilll’s Arrangement 1841.
  • Thomas Blanshard (b.c.1765-1824) entered the Methodist ministry in 1795 and served as a circuit minister in England and Wales until 1808 when he was appointed Book Steward. He served in that position for fifteen years after which he returned to the active ministry despite declining health. He died on February 20th 1824 after an illness lasting several months. Source: Arminian Magazine 1824, pp.645-646 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Michael Cousin (1782-1852) was born at Haworth in Yorkshire. He was converted under Methodist influence and joined the society in 1802. He was accepted as an itinerant by the Conference of 1804 and worked as a circuit minister until superannuation to Halifax circuit in 1846. Cousin had been suffering from heart disease for some time before his death on November 6 1852. Source: Minutes of Conference 1853.