Letter

Scope and Content

From Shawbury to [Mary Fletcher]. He is very grateful for all the trouble that Fletcher has taken with regard to himself, his daughter and their servants. [Robert?] Pugh is here and sends his regards. Olive and Molly [Mayor’s maidservants. See MAM/FL/5/7/2.] arrived at the Park a short time before the messenger and they all arrived safe a little before 5 in the afternoon. Olive [Bayley - see MAM/FL/5/7/4] was very tired but since getting up, she feels better than she expected – she sends her regards to Fletcher and to her [Olive’s] mother who will probably call on Fletcher to enquire how the journey went.

Mayor was also grateful for the half dozen copies of Fletcher’s ‘letter to M. de la Flechere’, [Fletcher, Mary, A letter to Mons. H.L. De la Fléchère, Assessor Ballival of Nyon (London : printed by R. Hindmarsh, and sold by G. Clark, 1786). De La Flechere was a close relation of Mary’s husband John Fletcher.] one of which he passed on to [Robert?] Pugh.

Mayor mentioned Tuesday rather than Monday for his preaching out of self-interest, [See MAM/FL/5/7/2] ‘wishing to be present at both exercises, having few opportunities of hearing & being constantly engaged in preaching. I respectfully understand your alternate Monday plans, & wished for neither of them to be deranged on my account, as I am pretty sure the people would feel the disappointment as well as myself. The being in class for an hour would be very pleasant to me, as the class would not be wholly put by, it would perhaps cause less dissatisfaction, than preaching on Monday. If the Lord please I will be with you early on Monday & will leave it to you to settle the matter as you shall judge best. Mr Pugh will at any rate preach for me on Tuesday, as from a circumstance I am going to mention, it will be doubtful whether I can reach home, in time for lecture then.’

Mrs Harris, the mother of the little boy that Mayor mentioned, is very desirous of sending the boy to school in Madeley. The parents feel however that Mr Walters’ [Walters was the Anglican curate at Madeley. Ministers often took on pupils as a means of augmenting their stipend.] terms are more than they can afford ‘& that his mode of living might give their son too high notions, to which he is already sufficiently inclined. If Mr [Walters] would take him as a day scholar & he could be boarded with some decent Godly people, it would be the plan best approved of by them. His parents are both professing people & his mother is a very gracious woman, the very flower of my flock. She is near her lying in [Abigail Harris gave birth to her fifth son George Joseph on 21 May 1794] & seems to think her time here [on this earth] will be but short, which makes her more anxious to fix her son immediately.’

Note

  • Abigail Harris - This is probably Abigail Harris nee Burnell who married John Harris, farmer of Moreton Corbet. John Harris died on 20 March 1804 at the age of 55 (Methodist Magazine 1821, 644). The boy referred to was the eldest son John (1786-1855) whose obituary appeared in the Wesleyan Methodist Magazine 1855, 382. Information provided by Mr. John Lenton.

Note

Note

  • Abigail Harris - This is probably Abigail Harris nee Burnell who married John Harris, farmer of Moreton Corbet. John Harris died on 20 March 1804 at the age of 55 (Methodist Magazine 1821, 644). The boy referred to was the eldest son John (1786-1855) whose obituary appeared in the Wesleyan Methodist Magazine 1855, 382. Information provided by Mr. John Lenton.