Letter

Scope and Content

From Rebecca Longmore in Oswestry to Mary Tooth. She regrets that her situation and circumstances are such that when she passed through Madeley last week, she did not have the time to call. She may appear thoughtless and ungrateful but Tooth can be assured that her kindness and that of her sister [Rosamund] will never be forgotten. The truth is, she feels weary and exhausted; it was with difficulty that she recalled the places where she had business to transact and she felt so sick that she feared a serious attack of illness before reaching home. Her excitement at the thought of visiting [Coalbrookdale] and the friends there had produced two or three restless nights before she left Oswestry. The hurry and bustle of travelling there by coach brought on a violent bilious attack and she felt very ill indeed on her way home, but she is now feeling much better, although her health in general is not very good. Sometimes for no apparent reason, her memory fails her and she is affected by a sort of confusion and fainting. She is forced to throw herself down on the couch many times a day – such is the case for nine days out of a fortnight. Spiritual matters are discussed with reference to the need to resign herself to the divine will.

Will Tooth favour them with a visit before the end of the summer? – she has a pony and gig and can therefore travel at will. She must try to come and bring her sister with her.

[Samuel] Dawson has been appointed their minister. He is a married man ‘for whom lodgings are to be taken. If they should wish to have our rooms, I fear it would hardly suit us, but it would depend a great deal on what sort of people they are’.

Her regards should be passed to Miss Hurd[?].

In a postscript, she asks that her best wishes be passed to Mrs Ballard with the request that she pass on Longmore’s regards to Mrs Paris in Coalbrookdale, Longmore had hoped to have seen her [Paris] again when she parted company with her on Tuesday morning, but her anxiety about catching the coach on Thursday and her indisposition caused her to return home on Wednesday.

Note

  • Samuel Dawson (fl.1830) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1826 and was appointed to be a missionary in Sierra Leone. He returned to Britain in 1829 and served circuits in England and Wales until 1839 when he was expelled by the Conference for intemperance. Source: Journal of Conference 1839 and Hill's Arrangement 1838

Note

Note

  • Samuel Dawson (fl.1830) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1826 and was appointed to be a missionary in Sierra Leone. He returned to Britain in 1829 and served circuits in England and Wales until 1839 when he was expelled by the Conference for intemperance. Source: Journal of Conference 1839 and Hill's Arrangement 1838