Letter

Scope and Content

From Ann Loxdale at 150 Dale Street, Liverpool to Mary Fletcher. Loxdale was grateful to receive Fletcher’s letter. Spiritual matters are discussed.

The Lord’s work is prospering here. It has long been in a flourishing state and the work is both spreading and deepening. Many have been added to the society. ‘The work of sanctification considerably prevails…Last band love feast Mr [Henry] Moore gave the people the privilege of hearing the letter read, of which I have requested to take a copy for you, knowing it would afford you much satisfaction to hear one profess to enjoy in so sweet a degree, what you have so many years seen to be privilege of all New Testament believers…’ Spiritual matters are further discussed in detail, with specific regard to the spiritual state of Loxdale and her sister [Sarah Hill].

They are very lucky to have excellent preachers that are very useful. They are united in their views and work together in complete harmony; [Henry] Moore, [William] Jenkins and [William] Williams - ‘the two latter are made useful in convincing & bringing souls to God. The former in building & establishing them in their most holy faith..’

The people here look forward with regret to the forthcoming conference [convened in Leeds on July 27th 1801] as it will be the end of Moore’s second year in this circuit and they can hardly expect to have such a fine minister to take his place.

A fine new chapel was opened here a year ago [see note below] and now one of the others is being ‘taken down’ and rebuilt – this will be the largest of the three Wesleyan chapels in Liverpool [Pitt Street, Mount Pleasant and Herculaneum]. No doubt all the chapels will be well-filled – they are in expectation of glorious days.

The account of dear Sally [Sarah Lawrence - Lawrence died in 1800] has been a means of blessing to many.

[Thomas and Sarah] Hill send their best wishes.

Notes

  • William Williams (d.1813) entered the itinerancy in 1796 and exercised an active circuit ministry until his death following a period of ill health while serving in Brentford. Source: Minutes of Conference 1813
  • 'new chapel': This is a reference to Herculaneum or Pottery Chapel. This was a small chapel that was built in about 1800 by a pottery company for the use of its workers, many of whom had moved to Liverpool from strong Methodist areas in Staffordshire. It remained a privately-owned chapel and its use was transferred to the Wesleyan Methodist Association in 1834.35. (The Methodist Chapels and Preaching Places of Liverpool and District 1750-1971 by Ian Sellars)
  • 'taken down' and rebuilt: Reference to the complete rebuilding of Pitt Street Chapel in 1803. This was the first Methodist chapel in Liverpool and had originally opened in 1750. (The Methodist Chapels and Preaching Places of Liverpool…by Sellars)

Note

Notes

  • William Williams (d.1813) entered the itinerancy in 1796 and exercised an active circuit ministry until his death following a period of ill health while serving in Brentford. Source: Minutes of Conference 1813
  • 'new chapel': This is a reference to Herculaneum or Pottery Chapel. This was a small chapel that was built in about 1800 by a pottery company for the use of its workers, many of whom had moved to Liverpool from strong Methodist areas in Staffordshire. It remained a privately-owned chapel and its use was transferred to the Wesleyan Methodist Association in 1834.35. (The Methodist Chapels and Preaching Places of Liverpool and District 1750-1971 by Ian Sellars)
  • 'taken down' and rebuilt: Reference to the complete rebuilding of Pitt Street Chapel in 1803. This was the first Methodist chapel in Liverpool and had originally opened in 1750. (The Methodist Chapels and Preaching Places of Liverpool…by Sellars)