Letter

Scope and Content

From M. A. Edwards at Langford. Spiritual matters are discussed with particular regard to the uplifting conversations which they [M. A. and her husband William Edwards] had with Tooth, and which will never be forgotten.

They have passed through many 'affecting changes' since they parted company with Tooth, and they have not all been pleasing.

They had a most easy and pleasant journey as far as Monmouth where they spent a comfortable week with friends before proceeding to Banwell, sixteen miles beyond Bristol. To their surprise they discovered that neither lodgings nor house had been provided, so that they were obliged to stay with friends. In the absence of the superintendent minister, they were quite at a loss as to what to do. Their friends were of the opinion that the preacher's house was large enough to accommodate both [ministerial] families, as both preachers had lived there previously. However, one of those had been single and the furniture was not sufficient to accommodate both families. [William's colleague Caleb] Simmons's family consists of himself, his wife and a daughter aged nineteen. They also have a son at Kingswood School, who will also be living with them from time to time. They therefore found themselves forced to take lodgings and were unable to find comfortable ones nearer than five miles from Banwell. As they have no children, she supposes that is why they were sent to a Circuit with only one house. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Banwell is a large village surrounded by other villages. She understands that the Circuit extends for twenty-four miles. [William] is away from home a great deal and M. A. has one mile to walk to chapel [in a] pretty village called Wrington, ten miles from Bristol. If Tooth could favour them with a visit, what a joy it would be. She was very grateful for the interest which Tooth showed in them - surely it was the Lord's design. M. A. enjoyed so many comforts under Tooth's roof, of both a temporal and a spiritual kind.

How is dear Mrs Williams? She hopes that she [Williams] is restored to health and that both her and her partner [Richard?] are well. She also trusts that [Rosamund Tooth] is doing fine.

Their love should be passed to Mrs Harper and family and similarly to Mr Smith and his family. Tooth's reply should be sent to her, care of Mr Kendall's at Langford.

In a postscript, she mentions that the last time [William] preached at Madeley [his last ministerial station], a young woman was deeply convinced of sin and thereafter followed him to different places where he was preaching funeral sermons '& wept in the most affecting manner. Her mother said she intended to meet in R. Bailey's class of Little Dawley'. If their regards could be passed on to the young lady, they would be obliged.

Notes

  • Caleb Simmons (1756-1826) was converted in 1781 and joined the itinerancy in 1794. He served Circuits in England and Wales and died in Exeter after a long period of ill health. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1819 and Minutes of Conference 1826
  • William Edwards (1790-1860) was converted in early life and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1813. He served Circuits in England and Wales until superannuation in 1849. Edwards died in Ispwich. He was a friend and correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Tooth. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1858, Fletcher-Tooth collection and Minutes of Conference 1860

Note

Notes

  • Caleb Simmons (1756-1826) was converted in 1781 and joined the itinerancy in 1794. He served Circuits in England and Wales and died in Exeter after a long period of ill health. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1819 and Minutes of Conference 1826
  • William Edwards (1790-1860) was converted in early life and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1813. He served Circuits in England and Wales until superannuation in 1849. Edwards died in Ispwich. He was a friend and correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Tooth. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1858, Fletcher-Tooth collection and Minutes of Conference 1860