Letter

Scope and Content

From Thomas Garforth at Scott Hall near Leeds. Spiritual matters are discussed. He spends as much time as possible at home with his servants and in the church 'with my dear people'. He keeps no company but the servants of God. Garforth is happy that Fletcher is placed in such a 'delightful situation [Madeley]…I rather wonder dear Mr [John] Fletcher should permit you to do only with Sally [Sarah Lawrence?]. Tell him from me he has got one of the best wifes in England'.

As for business, Sammy [Askwith?] paid him £50 a little after Christmas, which he has placed to Fletcher's account. Sammy said that he would want some money at May Day which is his next payment. 'There was a Asquith or Sparlin came to me about 2 weeks since & made a demand for £20 - I tould him he must waite a little untill I got your orders, he said he wd call me again…I think I will pay him. It is the person you mention I think he [unreadable word] at Morley. Johnson has called of me two times about his money. I spoke prettily to him of the ladey was gone out of the countrey he had me. He seemed well satisfied, however think I will pay him also. I hear nothing from any other…I shall let you know if anything apear disagreeable or uneasy…neither I shall any thing fall upon you disagreeable'.

He has seen Mr Barnard and he passes his respects. Barnard has spoken to Mr Sykes, Mr Preston's attorney, who told him that he [Sykes] intended to soon go up to London to settle that business concerning Cross Hall with Lord Dartmouth [William Legge].

Garforth's brother Peter called recently and asked for his regards to be passed on. Peter has wished for some time to accompany Garforth when he [Garforth] goes to preach on a Sunday. 'So he came down on the Saturday on purpose I had to go into the countrey to preach two times at a tolerable distance. I thought it was his buseyness to catch at any word I had spoke [missing word] cals it not according to grammar but at the latter preaching he was brought down to the very dust and wept most the time.'

Notes

  • Peter Garforth (1733-1811) was a miller of Skipton in Craven, Yorkshire, and was the brother of the local preacher Thomas Garforth who built Woodhouse Chapel, which Peter enlarged after his brother's death. Garforth entertained John Wesley during his first visit to Skipton in July 1766 and, with his wife Mary, was one of the founding members of the society there. In 1769 Skipton disappeared from the circuit books, but a new society was formed in 1787. Garforth remained both a committed Methodist and an Anglican. He is buried in the nave of Skipton parish church. Source: A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel J. Rogal (1997), John Wesley's journal and W. H. Dawson, History of Skipton (London 1882)
  • Thomas Garforth (d.1784) formed a Methodist class at Wrangthorn near Leeds in 1756. In 1769 he built at his own expense the first chapel in the village of Woodhouse. After his death in 1784 the chapel was enlarged by his brother Peter. John Wesley preached at Woodhouse in 1770 and 1780. Source: Woodhouse Methodist Church 1756-1940 by Harry Buckley

Note

Notes

  • Peter Garforth (1733-1811) was a miller of Skipton in Craven, Yorkshire, and was the brother of the local preacher Thomas Garforth who built Woodhouse Chapel, which Peter enlarged after his brother's death. Garforth entertained John Wesley during his first visit to Skipton in July 1766 and, with his wife Mary, was one of the founding members of the society there. In 1769 Skipton disappeared from the circuit books, but a new society was formed in 1787. Garforth remained both a committed Methodist and an Anglican. He is buried in the nave of Skipton parish church. Source: A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel J. Rogal (1997), John Wesley's journal and W. H. Dawson, History of Skipton (London 1882)
  • Thomas Garforth (d.1784) formed a Methodist class at Wrangthorn near Leeds in 1756. In 1769 he built at his own expense the first chapel in the village of Woodhouse. After his death in 1784 the chapel was enlarged by his brother Peter. John Wesley preached at Woodhouse in 1770 and 1780. Source: Woodhouse Methodist Church 1756-1940 by Harry Buckley