Letter

Scope and Content

From the [Swaffham circuit]. As [Sarah] Boyce is not able to fulfill her promise to write at this time because her head feels bad, Gregson is taking this opportunity to send a few lines by [Ann] Jordan who is leaving them on Monday morning. 'She [Jordan] has been with us to several places and spoken from the pulpit to the people with good effect. The power of the Lord being with her…if she could have staid a few weeks longer, I think a revival would have taken place. She tryed much for penitent prayer meetings and I hope the flame will kindle amongst the people, but we want help and more faith and prayer'. Gregson has very much enjoyed Jordan's company and has benefitted spiritually.

Gregson's health is much better and she has not had any return of her complaint. If Tooth can spare fifteen minutes, they would love to receive a note from her and particularly to receive news of Tooth's dear suffering sister [Rosamund]. Spiritual matters are discussed.

She has so far only seen one of their new preachers [Thomas] Talboys [stationed in Swaffham from 1831 to 1834]. He seems a very good preacher and a pleasant man - his wife has been unwell ever since they arrived in Swaffham and has suffered from poor health for a long time. Gregson hopes that Tooth likes [William] and Mrs Stones [stationed in Madeley from 1831 to 1833] - her best wishes should be passed to them.

A female preacher by the name of Smalls is staying with her. 'I think she is a useful woman in the Church, I have heard her but twice. She is to speak with us this eve. We females have been invited to hold a watch night…' They shall indeed rejoice if Tooth can visit them. Gregson hopes that Jordan can come again - her work was much blessed as every chapel in which they held meetings have been well attended. On Sunday by appointment, they speak twice at Saham [Toney]. On Saturday, she expects to see her brother-in-law [Henry] Francis, but her sister [Ann Francis] will not be able to come - she is now reading the word of God with notes and feels such a delight in it as she has never experienced before. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Their regards should be passed to Mrs Hurd, Miss Hazelwood and Miss Dorset.

Note

  • Thomas Talboys (1773-1851) was born at Cam in Gloucestershire. At the age of eighteen, he enlisted in the army and served in the West Indies where he fell under Roman Catholic influence for a short period. He bought himself out of the military and returned to England where he joined the Methodists and was converted. In 1808, Talboys was accepted by the Conference and was appointed to the West Indian mission where he served for eight years enduring some persecution. Talboys returned to the home ministry in 1817 and served circuits in England and Wales until superannuation in 1834. His retirement was spent first in Norfolk and then Dursley in Gloucestershire where he died after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1851

Note

Note

  • Thomas Talboys (1773-1851) was born at Cam in Gloucestershire. At the age of eighteen, he enlisted in the army and served in the West Indies where he fell under Roman Catholic influence for a short period. He bought himself out of the military and returned to England where he joined the Methodists and was converted. In 1808, Talboys was accepted by the Conference and was appointed to the West Indian mission where he served for eight years enduring some persecution. Talboys returned to the home ministry in 1817 and served circuits in England and Wales until superannuation in 1834. His retirement was spent first in Norfolk and then Dursley in Gloucestershire where he died after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1851