Letter

Scope and Content

From 32 Clarence Street, Liverpool, to Mary Tooth. Hill was very pleased last Sunday to receive some news about Tooth from a young man, lately returned from Madeley. It was good to hear that Tooth is in good health and that the work prospers in the Madeley area. Spiritual matters are discussed.

For some months past, God has been at work in Liverpool, and many were converted in one meeting alone - there is a more exact account in the Methodist Magazine for this month. 'Believers have been much stirred up and the great work of sanctification has been wonderfully spread. Indeed for a considerable time, the work seemed to be wholly confined to the members of our society, but after a while, the flame burst forth and first one & then another was seized upon…our preachers' hearts are all in it - there is the greatest unity subsists between them & they all set their shoulders to the work'. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

They have just had their missionary meeting and this was attended with great power and grace. The congregation was immense and the collections large beyond all expectation.

[Thomas] Hill sends his regards to Tooth and her sister [Rosamund].

The religious world has been enriched by the memoir of that saintly Lady [Darcy] Maxwell. Hill is now reading it with great profit.

Note

  • Lady Darcy Maxwell (1742-1810) was born in Brisbane, Scotland, the daughter of Thomas Brisbane. She was educated at home and in Edinburgh and at the age of seventeen was married to Sir William Maxwell. Her husband died after just three years, leaving her in possession of a substantial fortune. Maxwell was a member of the Church of Scotland and retained this allegiance despite joining the Edinburgh Methodist society in 1764. One of the few prominent Scottish Methodist converts, Maxwell was a close friend and regular correspondent of John Wesley. She founded a boys school in 1770 and was a generous supporter of Methodist and Anglican causes. In 1786 Maxwell was named executrix to Lady Glenorchy and was given a particular responsibility for maintaining Glenorchy's chapels and other institutions. Source: Annie Keeling, Eminent Methodist Women (1889), Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)

Note

Note

  • Lady Darcy Maxwell (1742-1810) was born in Brisbane, Scotland, the daughter of Thomas Brisbane. She was educated at home and in Edinburgh and at the age of seventeen was married to Sir William Maxwell. Her husband died after just three years, leaving her in possession of a substantial fortune. Maxwell was a member of the Church of Scotland and retained this allegiance despite joining the Edinburgh Methodist society in 1764. One of the few prominent Scottish Methodist converts, Maxwell was a close friend and regular correspondent of John Wesley. She founded a boys school in 1770 and was a generous supporter of Methodist and Anglican causes. In 1786 Maxwell was named executrix to Lady Glenorchy and was given a particular responsibility for maintaining Glenorchy's chapels and other institutions. Source: Annie Keeling, Eminent Methodist Women (1889), Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)