Letter

Scope and Content

From Caroline Stormont in Coventry to Mary Tooth. She was very pleased to receive Tooth’s letter. Henry’s way does not yet appear plain and they have received much advice from many quarters concerning their best possible course of action.

Reference is made to the Birmingham chapel opening. It will be a profitable event as Messrs [Robert] Newton, [Richard] Watson and [Jabez] Bunting will all be present. If Tooth intends to attend, they hope that she will consider proceeding onto Coventry, where she will be more than welcome. Caroline’s mother is insistent that she [Caroline] should attend the chapel opening, and she certainly hopes that nothing will prevent it.

Note

  • Richard Watson (1781-1833) was born at Barton-on-Humber in Lincolnshire. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1796 but withdrew on doctrinal grounds in 1801 and joined the Methodist New Connexion in 1803. He returned to the Wesleyan Church in 1812 serving as President of Conference in 1826 and as secretary to the Wesleyan Missionary Society from 1821 to 1825. He was a leading opponent of slavery. Watson was a gifted writer and theologian. In 1818 he wrote a reply to Dr Adam Clarke's doctrine of the Eternal Sonship which caused some dispute within the Church. In 1823 he began to publish his Theological Institutes which remained a standard for many years and in 1831 wrote a well-regarded life of John Wesley. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974)

Note

Note

  • Richard Watson (1781-1833) was born at Barton-on-Humber in Lincolnshire. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1796 but withdrew on doctrinal grounds in 1801 and joined the Methodist New Connexion in 1803. He returned to the Wesleyan Church in 1812 serving as President of Conference in 1826 and as secretary to the Wesleyan Missionary Society from 1821 to 1825. He was a leading opponent of slavery. Watson was a gifted writer and theologian. In 1818 he wrote a reply to Dr Adam Clarke's doctrine of the Eternal Sonship which caused some dispute within the Church. In 1823 he began to publish his Theological Institutes which remained a standard for many years and in 1831 wrote a well-regarded life of John Wesley. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974)