Letter

Scope and Content

From London to Cross Hall, Morley Common near Leeds, Yorkshire. He hopes that she has returned from [taking the waters] at Buxton in Derbishire and feels the benefit. Here they have had nothing but operations. His little boy John Bernard (his last name is derived from Mr Brocas) was born with two thumbs on his left hand which were equally well formed and were from the same joint. They were therefore obliged to have a consultation as to which to have removed. Mr Grindall took off the outer one and was concerned for some time afterwards as the wound did not heal properly for a month. It seems to be alright now although the remaining thumb is a little 'awry' but will hopefully soon be remedied.

Samuel junior's other eye was operated on about twelve days ago. This was another bad operation as ''by growing a year older, he was also a year cunninger & we found it exceedingly difficult to deceive him enough to keep him quiet''. The operation did however go well and hopefully that eye is now out of danger. His other eye improves all the time although they have never tried him with glasses. [Eleanor] and Charles are both very well as is [their brother] Billy.

Mary has doubtless been confused about the money. The act was very necessary and will certainly be executed. As the law allows a certain amount for wear it has caused a certain difficulty as to how much that will be. The Lords of the Treasury have therefore issued an edict that all guineas of the following weights shall be current until September 21 after which there will be a new regulation:

  • 1. All guineas of any former King must weigh 5" 3 grains or deficient about one shilling.
  • 2. All guineas of his present Majesty [King George III] coined before January 1 1772 must weigh 5" 6 grains or deficient about six pence.
  • 3. All new guineas coined since 1 January 1772 must weigh 5" 8 grains or deficient no more than two pence and one half penny.

All guineas which are deficient more than the above amounts are to be cut in half and may then be paid away at £3.17.10 1/2 and will be accepted at that price at the bank or excise office etc.

The weight of a new guinea without any wear is 5" 9 4/10.

Mary had better copy out the above and follow the rules with regard to her coin. Here in London no man will receive £5 without weighing it first.

He would like her to inform him what she would like to do about the twenty acres at Leytonstone on which the same kind of fine is applicable as on the freehold. Samuel has kept hold of it in the hope that some other person may have business to do which might reduce the expenses. Financial details are further discussed.