Acomb Manor Court Archive

Scope and Content

Manorial court records of Acomb Manor with Clifton and Holgate, 1660-1855, including presentments, pains laid, surrenders, call rolls and associated papers.

Administrative / Biographical History

The manor of Acomb is recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century. At this time it was already in the possession of the Archbishop of York. In 1228 the Archbishop gave the manor to the treasurers of York Minster who held it as a prebendal manor until 1547 when it was surrendered to the Crown.

The Crown retained the manor until 1623 when James I gave it back to the Archbishop of York in exchange for York House and other properties in St Martin in the Fields, Middlesex. The Archbishop later sold the manor to Francis Barlow in 1855 and the Barlow family held it until 1925 when the lordship was extinguished. For much of its history the manor was farmed out to various families for eleven year periods.

The manor comprised Acomb, Clifton and Holgate as well as the rents of Skelton and Wigginton. Manorial courts were held twice a year in Acomb, at Easter and at Michaelmas.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1999.

Note

The manor of Acomb is recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century. At this time it was already in the possession of the Archbishop of York. In 1228 the Archbishop gave the manor to the treasurers of York Minster who held it as a prebendal manor until 1547 when it was surrendered to the Crown.

The Crown retained the manor until 1623 when James I gave it back to the Archbishop of York in exchange for York House and other properties in St Martin in the Fields, Middlesex. The Archbishop later sold the manor to Francis Barlow in 1855 and the Barlow family held it until 1925 when the lordship was extinguished. For much of its history the manor was farmed out to various families for eleven year periods.

The manor comprised Acomb, Clifton and Holgate as well as the rents of Skelton and Wigginton. Manorial courts were held twice a year in Acomb, at Easter and at Michaelmas.

Other Finding Aids

The archive has not yet been catalogued, please contact the Borthwick Institute for further information.

Alternative Form Available

Some of these records are copied from Acomb Manor Court rolls. The court rolls, 1550-1760, have been edited and published by Harold Richardson as 'Court Rolls of the Manor of Acomb', volumes I-II, (1969 and 1978).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 06.04.17.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Related Material

The Borthwick Institute also holds 19 documents relating to the manor of Acomb with Holgate and Clifton, 1692-1874, as part of its Miscellaneous Documents archive (Reference: MD/246), as well as further manorial records as part of the York Diocesan Archive, records of the Church Commissioners (Reference: CC/Ab/1).

Further records of Acomb Manor Court, 1544-1917, are deposited at York Explore. North Yorkshire Record Office hold a manorial court book, 1739-1792, and East Riding of Yorkshire Archives and Local Studies Centre hold notices to pay fines, 1814-1818, and a draft estreat, 1818-1822. There are also selected manorial records deposited at The National Archives, including a rental survey, 1608-1609, deed and award of enfranchisement of copyhold land, 1862, and file of evidence relating to enfranchisement of copyhold land, 1840-1900.

Additional Information

Published

GB193