Papers of the Gold family of Heslington

Scope and Content

Papers of the Gold family of Heslington, comprising mainly legal and financial papers of Joyce Gold, Nicholas Charles Gold, Charles Edmund Gold, Louisa Isabella Gold and Alice Mary Gold, some relating to land in Hovingham and at Dalkey in Ireland, 1798-1924.

Papers of the Prowde family comprising mainly legal and financial papers, including papers relating to land at Hovingham, 1752-1879, the living of Oake in Somerset, 1820s, and the commonplace books of Richard Prowde of Hovingham, 1703-1772.

Papers of the Steele family, comprising mainly legal and financial papers relating to Thomas Steele and Louisa Isabella Steele (later Gold), including papers concerning property in Kingston and Kilkenny in Ireland, 1839-1875.

Papers of the Smith family, comprising mainly legal and financial papers of Sarah Smith, Reverend William Henry Smith, Eleanor Mary Smith and Thomas Smith, some relating to land in Acomb, Tunstall and Huntington, Yorkshire, 1800-1879.

Miscellaneous legal and financial papers, many relating to land and property in Newton upon Derwent, Yorkshire, 1677-1875.

Administrative / Biographical History

The Gold family’s connection to Heslington originated with Joyce Gold (c.1771-1854). Born in Ireland, Joyce was working as a printer and publisher in London by 1796, in partnership with John William Bunney. In 1799 Joyce married Bunney’s sister Ann and in that same year he and Bunney launched the Naval Chronicle, described as a ‘literary work dedicated to the interests of the Royal Navy.’

The partnership was dissolved by 1802 and Joyce continued alone until 1818 and thereafter worked as a letterpress printer. Upon his retirement he moved to Heslington, near York, and subsequently became Director of York’s Union Bank. Joyce died in 1854.

Joyce and Ann Gold had four children together: Ann, born c.1801; Sophia, born c.1805; Nicholas Charles, also known as Charles, born 1808; and Elizabeth, born 1806. Elizabeth was the only daughter to marry, she wed Colonel John Stainforth in 1841.

Nicholas Charles trained as a solicitor and worked in York and London. In 1836 he married Ann Alice Smith at Fulford. It was through Ann that the Golds are connected to the Smith and Prowde families. Ann’s maternal grandfather was the Reverend Francis Prowde of Oake in Somerset and the Prowdes also had connections to Hovingham in Yorkshire. Her paternal relations were the Smith family who held land at Acomb and Holderness. Ann’s elder brother was Reverend William Smith and her uncles were William and Thomas Smith, both Aldermen of York.

Nicholas and Ann’s eldest child and only son, Charles Edmund Gold, was born in 1838. He followed his father into the law, also practicing in York and London. In 1861 he married Louisa Isabella Steele, whose family originated from Ireland, where they held land in Kingstown in County Dublin. His sister Ann married Richard Blake Steele, possibly a brother of Isabella. Charles and Louisa had three children, Alice Mary who died unmarried in 1935; Ida Mary who married Harold Cundall; and Louisa Eleanor who married John Barclay.

Charles Edmund Gold died in 1884 and Louisa Gold died in 1904.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was gifted to the Borthwick Institute in 2013.

Note

The Gold family’s connection to Heslington originated with Joyce Gold (c.1771-1854). Born in Ireland, Joyce was working as a printer and publisher in London by 1796, in partnership with John William Bunney. In 1799 Joyce married Bunney’s sister Ann and in that same year he and Bunney launched the Naval Chronicle, described as a ‘literary work dedicated to the interests of the Royal Navy.’

The partnership was dissolved by 1802 and Joyce continued alone until 1818 and thereafter worked as a letterpress printer. Upon his retirement he moved to Heslington, near York, and subsequently became Director of York’s Union Bank. Joyce died in 1854.

Joyce and Ann Gold had four children together: Ann, born c.1801; Sophia, born c.1805; Nicholas Charles, also known as Charles, born 1808; and Elizabeth, born 1806. Elizabeth was the only daughter to marry, she wed Colonel John Stainforth in 1841.

Nicholas Charles trained as a solicitor and worked in York and London. In 1836 he married Ann Alice Smith at Fulford. It was through Ann that the Golds are connected to the Smith and Prowde families. Ann’s maternal grandfather was the Reverend Francis Prowde of Oake in Somerset and the Prowdes also had connections to Hovingham in Yorkshire. Her paternal relations were the Smith family who held land at Acomb and Holderness. Ann’s elder brother was Reverend William Smith and her uncles were William and Thomas Smith, both Aldermen of York.

Nicholas and Ann’s eldest child and only son, Charles Edmund Gold, was born in 1838. He followed his father into the law, also practicing in York and London. In 1861 he married Louisa Isabella Steele, whose family originated from Ireland, where they held land in Kingstown in County Dublin. His sister Ann married Richard Blake Steele, possibly a brother of Isabella. Charles and Louisa had three children, Alice Mary who died unmarried in 1935; Ida Mary who married Harold Cundall; and Louisa Eleanor who married John Barclay.

Charles Edmund Gold died in 1884 and Louisa Gold died in 1904.

Other Finding Aids

This material has not yet been catalogued.

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 30.08.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB193