Letter

Scope and Content

From Hankow. He has had a slight accident. While bending over his chair to open a drawer, he felt a snap and was sure that he had again broken a rib. The discomfort increased over the next few days leaving him with the problem of getting strapped up without anyone knowing. 'For a combination of a broken rib & the present situation might quite conceivably, in imaginative hands be the basis of a fabrication which would bring me quite a lot of...unwanted publicity. To live in this house is to have everything watched & commented upon. So I had to be cautious'. Dr [Sarah] Wolfe told him there would be no harm in waiting a day or two. Yesterday he took advantage of the Rowleys [William and his wife] going to Wesley College for the weekend to get Dr [Ralph] Bolton to bind him up a bit and now it is okay. He is not inconvenienced at all except for a little tenderness when he gets certain muscles moving.

He preached this morning for the first time in two months. [H. W. Kenneth] Sandy has gone to preach a trial sermon at Chiangkow[?]. [Ernest Henry] Livesley is back from Shanghai and has gone to hear Sandy preach. Livesley came back primarily to help with the accounts. Considering recent circumstances, it is hardly surprising that they need some unravelling.

Emily's letter after the visit to the Mission House did him some good. 'I never told you what a great gun I was there. That was my humility which you were always despising'. He shall write and tell [Charles William] Andrews how grateful he is for the kind reception which Emily received at the Mission House.

Emily seems to be doing very well for the children but she must really operate on the basis of a general estimate of income and expenditure and not piecemeal. He wonders if she is being a little previous about the house. Is it clear that the MacFarlane's are coming immediately? Still it is well to be prepared.

Tiffin is now over. [Sarah] Wolfe and Messrs Sandy and [Ernest Henry] Livesley have left. They had quite a nice congregation this morning and given peace, they should make progress.

Small incidents are always happening. Yesterday there was some difficulty in persuading two hundred soldiers to get off the [unreadable word] which they were trying to use as transport. Reference is made to a Mr Caley - the rest of the sentence is unreadable. Yesterday they had a meeting of the Missionary committee. The Yangain-Tayeh area is always wild and the preacher felt that he had to flee. Mission property[?] is now in the hands of political and labour offices. Proclamations against it are having little effect.

He had a feast at Dr Yen's the other day when he went to talk over the business of the Health Bureau and the hospitals. The Mayor was present - he has had four years in Japan and seven in France. He is a clever chap aged thirty-three and is in many ways typical of the [Nationalist] movement which in its origin is not a 'labour revolution'. That is only the Communist side of it. [Ernest Henry] Livesley travelled with Eugene Chen's children [Trinidad-born Foreign Minister of the Chinese Nationalist Government] who have just returned from England of all places. 'These are the revolutionaries & the labour movements are their tools. Is the tail ultimately going to wag the dog, I wonder?' This week he has been reading Anatole Francis's Mother of Pearl, the closing stories of which are about the French Revolution. The current situation in China is somewhat similar.

[William H.] Pillow got here from Changsi this week. He is making his headquarters at the C.I.M for the time being.

H B R is looking forward to a straight talk with [William Rowley] tomorrow, which will clear many things up. This sort of dual control arrangement will not do, and the sooner he gets out and H B R gets in, the better. In running after so many details, [Rowley] is so like [Joseph Kimber Hill] In prying into all sorts of things, he has no equal. 'In the meantime his own garden he has not kept'.

He preached this morning. It was very joyful - there is too much politics.

Notes

  • Joseph Kimber Hill (1867-1952) was born in York, the son of a distinguished Methodist layman and nephew of David Hill the pioneering missionary to China. He was educated at the Leys School in Cambridge and offered himself for the ministry in 1886. Hill served in China from 1890 to 1921. He covered the cost of his ministry from his private income and after returning to a circuit ministry in England paid for a substitute to take his place. During his time in China, his son died at the age of eleven months. As a result of this tragedy Hill founded an home for destitute boys at Suichow and Kwangtsi. Hill was elected to the Legal Hundred in 1927. He superannuated in 1941. Source: Minutes of Conference 1953

Note

Notes

  • Joseph Kimber Hill (1867-1952) was born in York, the son of a distinguished Methodist layman and nephew of David Hill the pioneering missionary to China. He was educated at the Leys School in Cambridge and offered himself for the ministry in 1886. Hill served in China from 1890 to 1921. He covered the cost of his ministry from his private income and after returning to a circuit ministry in England paid for a substitute to take his place. During his time in China, his son died at the age of eleven months. As a result of this tragedy Hill founded an home for destitute boys at Suichow and Kwangtsi. Hill was elected to the Legal Hundred in 1927. He superannuated in 1941. Source: Minutes of Conference 1953