Letter

Scope and Content

From Kunming, to Emily Rattenbury at 2 Brayton Gardens, Enfield West, London. They leave at 5 am tomorrow for a long days run to Hueipse[?], [Frederick Walter James] Cottrell's old home. They should be back here on the 18th and then off to Weining. They will be absent from here for three weeks.

This city is incredibly different from the way it was in 1939. 'Progress & strikes marching hand in hand...'

[Edward Henry] Moody and his wife are great people. They have matured in the work enormously.

The Vice-Consul here, Brooksfield[?], was a pupil of Gordon's at [unreadable school name].

It was good to hear that a party of twenty [missionaries] started yesterday for China. Everyone here rejoices at the news.

H B R has had two very good services today in Chinese and English. They sang [hymn] 915 and often use it. His Chinese seems as good or at least no worse than ever. He was able to preach and take part in discussions with ease and appeared to be understood.

He is wondering about Joan and about Emily's visit to the United States. There has been no letter for a long time now. The strikes in Calcutta must have upset things. She should use air-mail for any important letter. [Hilda] Porter is speaking via an interpreter at the evening service tonight, so H B R is resting at home.

Notes

  • Edward Henry Moody (1908-72) was born in Islington, London. He spent a pre-collegiate year in Leeds and after training for the United Methodist ministry at Victoria Park was appointed to the South China District in 1932. Moody worked in China for sixteen years mainly among the Miao people. During World War 2 he also worked as a part-time chaplain particularly among USA forces. After leaving China, Moody served in the circuit ministry until 1967 when he was invited to become General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in New Zealand where he spent the rest of his life. Source: Minutes of Conference 1973.

Note

Notes

  • Edward Henry Moody (1908-72) was born in Islington, London. He spent a pre-collegiate year in Leeds and after training for the United Methodist ministry at Victoria Park was appointed to the South China District in 1932. Moody worked in China for sixteen years mainly among the Miao people. During World War 2 he also worked as a part-time chaplain particularly among USA forces. After leaving China, Moody served in the circuit ministry until 1967 when he was invited to become General Secretary of the British and Foreign Bible Society in New Zealand where he spent the rest of his life. Source: Minutes of Conference 1973.