Letter

Scope and Content

From Hankow. He had a communion service at Pai Lu Kai this morning and the [London Missionary Society] Griffith John Memorial this afternoon - 'a fine congregation but not a very good time [sermon] on "I sent you to reap...not laboured". On Friday he spoke to the graduating nurses on "The hands of Jesus".

Letters are rather uncertain in their arrival just now. After waiting for a fortnight, the news of April 10 arrived here yesterday. He was sorry to read that Emily has been unwell but it was a good time to get a rest.

He was grateful to receive the boys' school reports. '[Alfred Barrett] Sackett's comment on Morley is not very hopeful it would seem. [Morley] writes to me keenly & I think is developing religiously. Perhaps first class academic honours are not for us. If other things fail, I wonder what are the Edinburgh prospects with the Dixons there...Scotland has a lot of aids to education. Anyhow he had better just press on, undiverted, for the present. So Peter is to go to [Kingswood School]. Well, you are there to think over & plan these things & I must be content.'

He had hopes that there would be something from Emily or the [Mission House] re the first nomination telegram [re the Mission House Secretaryship]. It will probably be in the next letter. H B R is finding it difficult to bottle these things up without confiding in a colleague. 'I was bound to tell [William H.] Pillow - to explain something else & yesterday felt I had better let [William] Rowley know by post, how the land lies'.

The whole nomination business is indefinite until Conference and there is none here with whom he can share these concerns. He has asked [Edgar Wesley] Thompson to send him a wire from Conference but he will probably forget.

The mission staff are back in Tsinan and [Sarah] Wolfe is at Anlu on the way to Tsinan. 'She has the soul of the good shepherd'. He hears that [George] Haddon is on his way home - 'if they [Mission House?] take my advice to the letter they are on impregnable ground; if they do not, the Lord help them...'. Reference is made to G. [Gordon?] and Eileen.

[William] Rowley's [health] improves slowly. 'He wrote me such a nice letter today; so he must be getting near the golden gates, I think! He is 65.5 in age. Ain't he wonderful'.

He got the [synod] minutes and covering letter off this week. With the delayed post and late synod it will possibly cause problems at the London end.

The weather here is clammy and thundery with incessant rain.

Next Sunday he hopes to take the W.F.K. anniversary and spend the weekend in Wuchang. All being well, this time next year he may be on his way home.

Notes

  • Alfred Barrett Sackett (1895-1977) was the son of the Wesleyan minister A. B. Sackett. He was educated at Kingswood School and Merton College Oxford. Sackett served as an infantry officer during World War 1 and was awarded the Military Cross. He taught at Christ's Hospital School from 1922 to 1928 and was then appointed headmaster of Kingswood. Sackett introduced a more liberal regime and presided over an increase in the school's size, accompanied by considerable improvements in facilities. One of his major achievements was the bringing of the school successfully through the disruption caused by World War 2. After retirement in 1959, Sackett remained actively involved in Methodist affairs. He was a member of the World Methodist Committee between 1950 and 1966 and wrote several articles for the Wesley Historical Society. Source: Who was Who 1971-80, Kingswood School in Wesley's Day and Since by A.G. Ives (1970) and Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974).

Note

Notes

  • Alfred Barrett Sackett (1895-1977) was the son of the Wesleyan minister A. B. Sackett. He was educated at Kingswood School and Merton College Oxford. Sackett served as an infantry officer during World War 1 and was awarded the Military Cross. He taught at Christ's Hospital School from 1922 to 1928 and was then appointed headmaster of Kingswood. Sackett introduced a more liberal regime and presided over an increase in the school's size, accompanied by considerable improvements in facilities. One of his major achievements was the bringing of the school successfully through the disruption caused by World War 2. After retirement in 1959, Sackett remained actively involved in Methodist affairs. He was a member of the World Methodist Committee between 1950 and 1966 and wrote several articles for the Wesley Historical Society. Source: Who was Who 1971-80, Kingswood School in Wesley's Day and Since by A.G. Ives (1970) and Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974).