Letter

Scope and Content

From Hankow. He is home again and is now sharing with [Frederick C.] Cram and [Richard] Hailwood, later to be joined by [Dr John W.] Pell. They are good hard-working men 'not likely to be always letting their brains run off with them - though the former is a Birmingham B.A. & the latter a London B.D. The latter is rather deformed but has mental & spiritual compensations. He took the P.M. last night in a quite fresh & happy way...'.

On the Friday they had a reception for Dr and Mrs Outerbridge, Mr and Mrs Richards, Mr and Mrs Simpson, Cram & Hailwood. Dr [Alfred Wyatt] Hooker and Mr [A.C.] Franklin have gone on to Changsha. On the route they should have gone, the train was held up for eight hours while soldiers cleared the line of Communist bandits who had managed to loot an isolated station - so they are getting some tales to tell. Franklin is enjoying every minute of his visit this time and will certainly return home a lover of China and the Chinese Church. Ted [E. Curtiss Franklin?] is doing well as H B R's 'curate'. Last year was difficult for all of them.

Yesterday wires arrived announcing that [Arthur Preston] Hadwen and his family would be delayed a few weeks by sickness and that one nurse is to sail on December 8th and that they are doing all they can to find a second.

Notes have also arrived from [William Alexander] Grist rejecting H B R's Indian visit and a long letter from [George Edward Hickman] Johnson. H B R still thinks that it is all a little uncertain - they want him at the Mission House in July but he is to have no role until September. He has a feeling that Johnson's health may have to be considered. Still, H B R must think it all out 'and argue a little before I obey'. People here have the notion that he should visit Yunnan and North China before going home.

He is enclosing further money from the sale of the bungalow. Financial details are discussed.

The G.B.S. is starting the campaign to raise 30,000 Hong Kong dollars to balance the 30,000 that will be given by the Home Committee. [Margaret] Crabtree donated £750 which has been used to convert the old minister's house into a three story hostel building - easily one of the best buildings in Wu-han. Mr [A. C.] Franklin is to open this on November 30th when they will also be having a rummage sale for raising funds. Meanwhile the girls are all busy with needlework and every-one seems keen to get a move on. 1937 will be the fortieth anniversary of the school's foundation and they hope by then to have their new teaching block erected. In spite of [William and Priscilla] Rowley, Kuo Fang is doing tremendously well. 'I tried to stop them taking Mei En. At present I do not see where she can or could be fitted in. Of course, she will be able to do something somewhere but, with us, where?...'

H B R is very busy after his long absence and the time taken up with [Dr Alfred Wyatt] Hooker etc. When H B R is a [Mission] Secretary he will remember how much extra work these visits involve and will try to make them worthwhile. Now he hears that Kenneth McLennan is coming and they must 'treat him kindly & all that'.

Later that day .

He broke off in order to go to the English service and communion. H B R officiated and they had a great time. It is good to see all the new people settling in. He also preached at the Union Church this morning and donated his preaching fee of 10 Hong Kong dollars to the G.B.S. fund - he never takes such payments for himself anyway.

He recognised another Damock girl in the church this morning, but she was gone before he could make her acquaintance. He thinks that she is teaching in the Hankow private school.

Notes

  • Richard Hailwood (1907-61) was born in Blackburn, Lancashire. He was educated at Giggleswick School and Cliff College. After three months in mission work, he entered Richmond College to train for the Wesleyan ministry. During his four years there he was an exchange student at Marburg University. Hailwood was a missionary in China from 1933 to 1939 and was in charge of a refugee camp during the Sino-Japanese war. After his return to Britain he served as a circuit minister and as Candidates Secretary. Source: Minutes of Conference 1961.

Note

Notes

  • Richard Hailwood (1907-61) was born in Blackburn, Lancashire. He was educated at Giggleswick School and Cliff College. After three months in mission work, he entered Richmond College to train for the Wesleyan ministry. During his four years there he was an exchange student at Marburg University. Hailwood was a missionary in China from 1933 to 1939 and was in charge of a refugee camp during the Sino-Japanese war. After his return to Britain he served as a circuit minister and as Candidates Secretary. Source: Minutes of Conference 1961.