Letter

Scope and Content

From Hankow. The photograph arrived last Monday, just before [James] Heady and family left. It is now framed along with Emily's and sits in the drawing room for visitors to see. Perhaps Gordon will send his also.

Reference is made to [H. W. Kenneth] Sandy and Carrie's [luggage?] turning up.

The baptismal service for Thomas Wilson Bolton is this afternoon. [Edith] Milner leaves tonight to be followed by Grace [Ridge] probably on Friday. H B R's presence will then be of real benefit. Richardson and McLelland are here with him. The latter 'keeps house' and does it very well. Cheng Sen Fu and his family are back, though H B R has yet to see the lady. They apparently had a boy back in the cold spell who froze to death in the night. The mother was too weak to come for him and there was nobody around with wits enough to render assistance.

H B R is delighted with the above-mentioned photograph - Peter is very good indeed. 'As to that young man's earlier entry of Kingswood are there not other things to be said? All along he & Arnold have been so mutually jealous of one another's place in the sun that Peter especially has never recently been at his best. It is good news that Arnold has settled so well at Kingswood. He needs the independence that comes from boarding school life. Do you not think that Peter needs what he is getting now, a little more than his share of you? There is also the question of when his education allowances END. If he need not draw them till a year or two hence it is better for him & for us. We want the best for each & all...'

[William] Rowley comes up on Tuesday. They are to talk things over on Wednesday and Thursday and then hopefully he will leave again. Rowley will probably depart for [home] furlough during or after the summer. Their discussions will clarify that and other matters.

There is no definite word from Joy [Hurn]. H B R wishes to know soon and for certain when she leaves for China and when she is expected to arrive. [Sarah] Wolfe's [home] furlough lies ahead and she should know at least two months in advance. [Sarah Wolfe: Medical missionary. First appointed to China in 1915] Could Emily find this out and let him know?

The health of the people here is not too good at present. [Margaret] Swann [Lay missionary. First appointed to China in 1925] is in bed with a chill, [E. Curtiss] Franklin with a bad leg, Connie Pullen is still very weak, Miss Sanderson is not very strong and [Sarah] Wolfe likewise. [Nora] Booth is also off work.

He has a feeling that the floods wore people down more than they realised. In general there is increased impoverishment and a drabness that is very depressing. The sunshine will however be here soon.

H B R has an interview tomorrow morning with [George] Haddon. He can simply tell him that his contract is up at the end of May. H B R does not think that Haddon will return to Ireland in which case he will probably join another mission. It is all very sad and' poor old Heady is spared many a sleepless night'.

He has discovered that [James Maxwell] Gratton and family had him down to share their mission bungalow at Kuling. 'He is the senior now but a man constitutionally incapable of heavy toil. The Grattons and the Gedyes [family of Alfred John Gedye] are mutually critical. The former likes odd jobs, secretaryships & things. He has not got the Chinese he ought to have as a missionary, nor Sandy. [Arthur Preston] Hadwen is much better than either. The others are coming along. [George Robson] Osborn is a good fellow & will link up more easily up with us but I do not like to think of us becoming an educational & medical mission - we who should be evangelists or nothing. The Chinese for the job are not here. They are coming along but the [unreadable words] is heavy & the Chinese staff is not in sight yet. Hunan [province] with [Clifford Vallance] Cook, Hutchinson, [Albert Godfrey] Leigh, Barker, Stanfield, has an evangelistic staff that we cannot match with our wider work'.

They would like Miss Pritchard to go to Hanyang on her return, [from England] but H B R does not know if this is possible. Emily should let Pritchard know. He does not see how Wuchang 'can be left without a worker of any sort, as is likely to happen, if we do not mind [ie take care]'.

Notes

  • Alfred John Gedye (1898-1969) was born at Wuchang in China, where his father was headmaster of Wesley College. He was educated at Kingswood School and left as soon as he was old enough to join the army. At the end of World War 1 he trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth. Gedye served as a missionary in China for twenty-eight years. He was interned by the Japanese during World War 2 and was finally forced to return to England in 1950 after the Communist victory. He served as a circuit minister until superannuation in 1962, after which he was appointed warden of John Wesley's Chapel, the New Room in Bristol. Source: Minutes of Conference 1970 and Methodist Recorder July 24 1969, p.12.
  • Arthur Preston Hadwen (1899-1954) was born in Lancaster. He received an elementary education and subsequently worked in an office. He enlisted in 1917 and was wounded and taken prisoner in his first engagement. Hadwen trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Didsbury College and served as a missionary in China from 1925 to 1945. He was interned in Shanghai during the war and after his release returned to circuit work in England. He died suddenly at Bardney in Lincolnshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1955.
  • di Clifford Vallance Cook (1906-72) was born in Bristol, the son of the Wesleyan minister Vallance Cook. After a year at Cliff College, he trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth. Cook served as a missionary in the Hunan District of China from 1929 to 1952. During the Japanese invasion, he served as the Missionary Committee representative with a particular responsibility for supplying money to missionaries working in occupied territory. In 1952 he transferred to Hong Kong and worked with refugees from Communist China. Cook returned to Britain in 1954 and after several years circuit ministry in Manchester and Gloucester, spent four years as the warden of Methodist International House in London. His last appointment was to the Hull circuit, where he died after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1972 and Methodist Recorder February 17 1972, p.14.
  • Albert Godfrey Leigh (1906-39) was born in London. He trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth and was appointed to the Hunan District of China in 1930. After returning from furlough in 1939, he was appointed to the Pingkiang Circuit, which was in the front line of the war between Nationalist China and Japan. He was killed during a Japanese air-raid on March 15th 1939, after entering the basement of a colleague's house to comfort children who were sheltering there. Source: Minutes of Conference 1939.
  • John Howard Stanfield (1888-1971) was born in London, the son of the Methodist minister John C. Stanfield. He was educated at Kingswood and taught for several years in Macclesfield before candidating for the Wesleyan ministry. He trained at Didsbury and in 1912 was appointed to serve overseas. Stanfield spent twenty-seven years in China where he taught for many years in the Methodist College at Wuchang. During his time as Chairman of the Hunan District, Stanfield witnessed the destruction of much of the mission property during the civil war of the late 1920s but was able to get the staff away safely. He returned home in 1938 and spent seven years in circuit ministry before going back to China for three years. After the Communist take-over, Stanfield returned to England and superannuated in 1959. Source: Minutes of Conference 1971.

Note

Notes

  • Alfred John Gedye (1898-1969) was born at Wuchang in China, where his father was headmaster of Wesley College. He was educated at Kingswood School and left as soon as he was old enough to join the army. At the end of World War 1 he trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth. Gedye served as a missionary in China for twenty-eight years. He was interned by the Japanese during World War 2 and was finally forced to return to England in 1950 after the Communist victory. He served as a circuit minister until superannuation in 1962, after which he was appointed warden of John Wesley's Chapel, the New Room in Bristol. Source: Minutes of Conference 1970 and Methodist Recorder July 24 1969, p.12.
  • Arthur Preston Hadwen (1899-1954) was born in Lancaster. He received an elementary education and subsequently worked in an office. He enlisted in 1917 and was wounded and taken prisoner in his first engagement. Hadwen trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Didsbury College and served as a missionary in China from 1925 to 1945. He was interned in Shanghai during the war and after his release returned to circuit work in England. He died suddenly at Bardney in Lincolnshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1955.
  • di Clifford Vallance Cook (1906-72) was born in Bristol, the son of the Wesleyan minister Vallance Cook. After a year at Cliff College, he trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth. Cook served as a missionary in the Hunan District of China from 1929 to 1952. During the Japanese invasion, he served as the Missionary Committee representative with a particular responsibility for supplying money to missionaries working in occupied territory. In 1952 he transferred to Hong Kong and worked with refugees from Communist China. Cook returned to Britain in 1954 and after several years circuit ministry in Manchester and Gloucester, spent four years as the warden of Methodist International House in London. His last appointment was to the Hull circuit, where he died after a long illness. Source: Minutes of Conference 1972 and Methodist Recorder February 17 1972, p.14.
  • Albert Godfrey Leigh (1906-39) was born in London. He trained for the Wesleyan ministry at Handsworth and was appointed to the Hunan District of China in 1930. After returning from furlough in 1939, he was appointed to the Pingkiang Circuit, which was in the front line of the war between Nationalist China and Japan. He was killed during a Japanese air-raid on March 15th 1939, after entering the basement of a colleague's house to comfort children who were sheltering there. Source: Minutes of Conference 1939.
  • John Howard Stanfield (1888-1971) was born in London, the son of the Methodist minister John C. Stanfield. He was educated at Kingswood and taught for several years in Macclesfield before candidating for the Wesleyan ministry. He trained at Didsbury and in 1912 was appointed to serve overseas. Stanfield spent twenty-seven years in China where he taught for many years in the Methodist College at Wuchang. During his time as Chairman of the Hunan District, Stanfield witnessed the destruction of much of the mission property during the civil war of the late 1920s but was able to get the staff away safely. He returned home in 1938 and spent seven years in circuit ministry before going back to China for three years. After the Communist take-over, Stanfield returned to England and superannuated in 1959. Source: Minutes of Conference 1971.