Letter

Scope and Content

From a ship on passage to India. They [H B R, Miss Hilda Porter and Mr Lockhart] expect to reach Bombay at about 3 am on July 23. They would have been there the night before but for a ship getting stuck in the Suez Canal and holding them up for a few hours. It has however been a very good journey so far with hardly any 'disturbance' [bad weather] before they encountered this Indian monsoon.

He has met lots of interesting people, read three of Muller's books, played a little, talked a little and generally rested. He has seen a lot of army life - not quite as blasphemous as it might have been but quite a lot of boredom and futility. They are mostly looking forward to being demobbed and a return to real life.

He does not suppose that he will write again before he arrives in Calcutta but he will send a cable from Bombay.

There are many nice people here - too many to get to know. There is all sorts in the British army. The real surprise is one Captain Pryce Hughes - grandson of Hugh Pryce Hughes and a good Methodist still!.

They have been thinking of Emily at Conference and at the [Women's Work] meeting. He wonders where Morley has been stationed [as a Methodist minister]? and who the next President of Conference is? They do not pass such news in the ship's bulletins.

Mr Lockhart seems very happy although Miss [Porter] is feeling the effects of the weather somewhat.

Notes

  • Hugh Price Hughes (1847-1902) was born in Carmarthen. He studied at University College London and Richmond College and entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1869. He founded the Methodist Times in 1885, and in 1887 was chosen as the first Superintendent of the new West London Mission, one of the successful experiments of the Forward Movement. Hughes was elected President of Conference in 1898 and participated in the Grindelward conversations between Anglicans and Free Churchmen in 1892-95. He was one of the founders of the National Evangelical Free Church Council and served as its first President in 1896. Hughes was deeply interested in politics and became prominent in 1890 for his attacks on the Irish politician Charles Parnell. He was instrumental in bringing the Wesleyan Methodists closer to the Liberal party. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism and Who was Who 1897-1914.

Note

Notes

  • Hugh Price Hughes (1847-1902) was born in Carmarthen. He studied at University College London and Richmond College and entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1869. He founded the Methodist Times in 1885, and in 1887 was chosen as the first Superintendent of the new West London Mission, one of the successful experiments of the Forward Movement. Hughes was elected President of Conference in 1898 and participated in the Grindelward conversations between Anglicans and Free Churchmen in 1892-95. He was one of the founders of the National Evangelical Free Church Council and served as its first President in 1896. Hughes was deeply interested in politics and became prominent in 1890 for his attacks on the Irish politician Charles Parnell. He was instrumental in bringing the Wesleyan Methodists closer to the Liberal party. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism and Who was Who 1897-1914.