Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Alfred Evans (1879-1967) was born in Bournemouth. He trained for the Bible Christian ministry at Shebbear College and after two years in a home Circuit, was appointed in 1906 to serve as a missionary in China. With the exception of periods of home furlough, Evans remained in China for the rest of his life, rising to the position of Chairman of the Yunnan District. He superannuated in 1943 and moved to Hong Kong in 1951 after the Communist take-over of the mainland. Source: Minutes of Conference 1967.
  • Albert Allan Conibear (1897-1953) was born on the island of St Helier, the son of the Bible Christian minister Albert James Conibear. He trained at Victoria Park College for the ministry of the United Methodist Church and was appointed to the Ningpo District of China in 1922. Conibear served in China until the outbreak of World War 2 when he returned to England and entered the home ministry. During his time in China, he had played a leading role in the development of a Chinese ministry and the establishment of a new Girls' School. Hle went back to China in 1945 and remained there for two years. After he returned to England, Conibear worked as the Birmingham Secretary and later the Home Secretary of the United Society for Christian Literature. He died in London after a long period of ill health. Source: Minutes of Conference 1953.
  • William Eddon (1868-1956) was born at Armlet' in Leeds, the son of a Methodist New Connexion minister of the same name. He trained for the ministry at Ranmoor College and after nine years in home circuits, sailed as a missionary to North China in 1901. Eddon became Superintendent of the Wuting Circuit in 1904 and evantually rose to the position of District Chairman. Failing health resulted in Eddon's superannuation and return to England in 1933. He settled in Liverpool. Source: Minutes of Conference 1957.
  • George Anthony Parkinson (1881-1956) was born in Durham, the son of a school master. Ile entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1902 and worked as a non-collegiate on the island of Jersey for twelve months before entering Headingly College. Parkinson served in the circuit ministry until 1927 when he joined the executive staff of the National Children's Home and remained in that work until superannuation in 1945. Source: Minutes or Conference 1957.

From Hankow. Her last letter to arrive was dated April 26th. There is a gap in the correspondence which should hopefully soon be filled.

The District Chairman's Conference is upon them. [W. Roy] Aylott [United Methodist Church] has been staying with "Bible Baker" [Cyril George Baker?] for a week. They have two 'evangelistic mission workers in that District of whom he is one; he has been out [in China] 6 mths'. The Chairman is unable to attend as his wife is expecting their first child 'so they presumably cannot be much more than chickens lie young]'.

They also have [Alfred] Evans from Yunnan District and [Albert Allan] Conibear from Ningpo (arrived yesterday) [both United Methodist Church]. [Edgar] Dewstoe arrived this morning and [William] Eddon [United Methodist Church] from Tientsin arrives tomorrow. [William Wildridge] Gibson is in the bath, having just arrived.

H B R does not think there will be much time for leisure for a week. He has been having his photograph taken with fairly satisfactory results. He has 'received' [been presented with?] a picture of Christ in Gethsemene, woven in silk and as nice as anything that he has seen of the type before. On Wednesday night he was entertained with [Herman Stanley] Dixon by the Wuchang missionaries - a pleasant relaxing evening of quiet reminiscences. The estimates for 1932 have been sent. He shall hand over the accounts in a fortnight.

His itinerary takes further shape. He hopes to spend three days in Peking and ten in Kuliang[?]. There will be a farewell meeting in the Chino Kou Circuit on June 24th.

He notices that Emily's friend George [Anthony] Parkinson wrote very approvingly in the children's column [of the Methodist Recorder?] of the efforts of Emily and Miss Liu Kueh Fang [at the Womens' Department meeting at Wesley's Chapel, City Road, London].

Note

Notes

  • Alfred Evans (1879-1967) was born in Bournemouth. He trained for the Bible Christian ministry at Shebbear College and after two years in a home Circuit, was appointed in 1906 to serve as a missionary in China. With the exception of periods of home furlough, Evans remained in China for the rest of his life, rising to the position of Chairman of the Yunnan District. He superannuated in 1943 and moved to Hong Kong in 1951 after the Communist take-over of the mainland. Source: Minutes of Conference 1967.
  • Albert Allan Conibear (1897-1953) was born on the island of St Helier, the son of the Bible Christian minister Albert James Conibear. He trained at Victoria Park College for the ministry of the United Methodist Church and was appointed to the Ningpo District of China in 1922. Conibear served in China until the outbreak of World War 2 when he returned to England and entered the home ministry. During his time in China, he had played a leading role in the development of a Chinese ministry and the establishment of a new Girls' School. Hle went back to China in 1945 and remained there for two years. After he returned to England, Conibear worked as the Birmingham Secretary and later the Home Secretary of the United Society for Christian Literature. He died in London after a long period of ill health. Source: Minutes of Conference 1953.
  • William Eddon (1868-1956) was born at Armlet' in Leeds, the son of a Methodist New Connexion minister of the same name. He trained for the ministry at Ranmoor College and after nine years in home circuits, sailed as a missionary to North China in 1901. Eddon became Superintendent of the Wuting Circuit in 1904 and evantually rose to the position of District Chairman. Failing health resulted in Eddon's superannuation and return to England in 1933. He settled in Liverpool. Source: Minutes of Conference 1957.
  • George Anthony Parkinson (1881-1956) was born in Durham, the son of a school master. Ile entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1902 and worked as a non-collegiate on the island of Jersey for twelve months before entering Headingly College. Parkinson served in the circuit ministry until 1927 when he joined the executive staff of the National Children's Home and remained in that work until superannuation in 1945. Source: Minutes or Conference 1957.