Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Charles William Andrews (1862-1940) was the son of the Wesleyan minister N. P. Andrews. He entered the ministry in 1885 and after nine years circuit work, was appointed to the newly formed Bolton Mission where he proved himself an evangelist of great ability. In 1907 he moved to the Leeds Oxford Place Mission and in 1910 was appointed one of the General Secretaries at the Missions House where he served with distinction until retirement in 1930. Source: Minutes of Conference 1940 and Methodist Recorder February 1 1940, p.6.

From Toronto. It is the day of his departure and Emily's letter of September 24th arrived this morning with the Ecumenical Conference enclosures. Emily's criticism is harsh, but he supposes that he can stand it - "with all thy faults I love thee still". Emily is certainly the greatest woman he has ever met. Other women may be more gentle and better able to see another person's point of view 'but you are just your own great self, strong in intellect as in physique, a boon and a blessing to this man'. Personal matters are further discussed.

He does not think that Emily realises how torn apart he has been in recent months. As far as he can ascertain both Chinese and foreigners associated with the Wesleyan and United Methodist Missions consider that H B R is essential to China just now. She knows better than anyone how much he has missed his wife and longs for her. These last five years of semi-separation has cost them both a great deal. Emily declares her certainty of what she sees as duty, but H B R simply cannot see his way. For the last three months and one more to come, he has been living between two worlds. Emily should pray that when they meet in November, they can see their way to a common opinion as to what should be done. Certainly no issue can be regarded as settled until they have made a decision together. Anyway, the world is faced with such a cataclysm [Great Depression] as to possibly change everything by November.

His stay here has been most enjoyable. Everyone has been very kind. He attended the Missionary Congress of the United Church [of Canada] but has given just one address - to Fred's Young People's Class.

Trevor Davies's church yesterday was wonderful. The building, service and preachers were all appealing. The communion service was attended by about eight hundred. Canada is a wonderful land with splendid educational opportunities - will any of their sons end up here?

Fred is likeable and Minnie is quiet but pleasant They have had their ups and downs but seem to be quite content with each other. Their children Gerald and Evelyn are also very nice and are like their parents in temperament.

Miss Booth's brother took her and H B R out to Niagara by car. They had an unforgettable day. He would like to come back to Canada with Emily some time.

He was most impressed with the Chinese exhibition in the museum here.

He does not seem to have a role to play in the Ecumenical Conference beyond attendance, which suits him as there will be a great deal to do later.

H B R's appointments to preach and give missionary addresses in England are discussed. He ought to go and see [Charles William] Andrews soon after his arrival home; perhaps they can go together.

As he sees it, the only issue facing them is whether they should take a home circuit in September 1932 or return to China. Trevor Davies and Michael [unreadable surname] both feel that for a returned missionary, [Herman Stanley] Dixon has a simply enormous task. H B R does not think that there is the slightest prospect of [H B R] getting a Mission House appointment, and if there were he would not make a single move to try to get it.

Note

Notes

  • Charles William Andrews (1862-1940) was the son of the Wesleyan minister N. P. Andrews. He entered the ministry in 1885 and after nine years circuit work, was appointed to the newly formed Bolton Mission where he proved himself an evangelist of great ability. In 1907 he moved to the Leeds Oxford Place Mission and in 1910 was appointed one of the General Secretaries at the Missions House where he served with distinction until retirement in 1930. Source: Minutes of Conference 1940 and Methodist Recorder February 1 1940, p.6.