Copy of Letter

Scope and Content

From William Seward in Bath to 'Son Scipio' [Africanus] in [London]. Seward read Scipio’s letter and is sorry that Scipio thinks badly of the brethren for their care of him. 'Had you been truly humble, you would have acknowledged you were [worse?] than they could describe you, that your heart was truly corrupt and a cage of unclean birds – and absolutely unfit for the Holy Spirit of God to dwell in – till you thus become low in your own eyes and to think meanly of yourself, till you are truly poor in spirit and know that you are nothing, have nothing, and can do nothing without Jesus Christ...I say, till you thus see and feel yourself a sinner, till you are content to be thought of by others the vilest of men...you are not fit to be a Christian. Consider, Christ himself was thus treated by men, and shall we look for better treatment - no, it is enough for the servant to be as his master...I should be glad to hear that you are counted mad as I am, and then I should have hopes of you, but while you are as wise in your own eyes and think you know something, you really know nothing, yet as you ought to know; go to Jesus Christ therefore and learn of him...'

Scipio should carry the enclosed letter to Mr Knapp [see note below] ‘after Cousin Robinson has directed it for him at 3 King’s Bench Walks, Temple'.

In a postscript, Seward asks what Scipio wants Mr Arskins’ sermons for.

Note

  • Possibly George Knapp (b.1694), who was educated at Pembroke College Oxford and was a barrister at the Inner Temple from 1717 (Alumni Oxonienses)

Note

  • Possibly George Knapp (b.1694), who was educated at Pembroke College Oxford and was a barrister at the Inner Temple from 1717 (Alumni Oxonienses)