Parish records of Osbaldwick with Murton

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1581-1655, 1661-1975 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1808-1812); register of marriages, 1581-1655, 1661-1836, 1838-1988; register of burials, 1581-1655, 1661-1992 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1808-1812); register of banns, 1827-1903, 1913-1982; register of services, 1957-1998; records concerning benefice income, including tithe redemption certificate, 1932, notes of land at Murton, 1707-1708, glebe conveyance, 1956, and papers, 1772-1815; charity records, including memoranda of bequests, 1626, 1637, 1732, 1766, 1820, Charity Commission’s meeting minutes and papers, 1956-2001,and other papers, 1866-1979; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1815-1942, briefs, 1729, fabric papers, 1828, 1920-1967, plans and elevations for church extension, 1963, and churchyard deed, 1940; records of incumbents, including license to vicar to live outside parish, 1849, dilapidations papers, 1956, 1961, parsonage house mortgage, 1955, letter, 1917, and vicarage insurance papers, 1924; records concerning parish rooms and societies, including Church Halls Committee minutes of meetings, 1967-1977; school records, including papers relating to former school house, 1920-1978; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minutes of meetings, 1920-1999, agreement for Murton common enclosure, 1661, Christian Stewardship Campaign minutes of meetings, 1963-1968, press cuttings and correspondence, 1953-1963, and parish magazines, 1933-1990 (with gaps).

Administrative / Biographical History

The present church of St Thomas, Osbaldwick, dates to the twelfth century. It was appropriated to the Prebend of Strensall, and a vicarage ordained there, in 1485, and remained subject to the prebend’s peculiar jurisdiction until the nineteenth century. The living was augmented in 1767, 1787 and 1800. In 1843 the advowson was transferred from the prebend to the Archbishop of York.

The church dates to the twelfth century and was restored in 1877-1878 by J. A. Scott of London, the son of architect Sir Gilbert Scott, with stained glass by J. W. Knowles of York.

The parish includes Murton, which has had a chapel of ease, St James, from around the twelfth century. St James had fallen into disrepair by the nineteenth century and was not used after 1836. However it was restored in 1912-1914 and rededicated in 1914 and has been an active church ever since.

In 1936 part of Osbaldwick was separated to create the parish of York, St Hilda, while another part was added to York, Holy Trinity, Heworth.

Today the parish, which includes the churches of St Thomas and St James, is part of the benefice of Osbaldwick with Murton.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1963 by the incumbent. Further additions were made to the archive in 1972, 1980, 1987, 1987, 2006 and 2007.

Note

The present church of St Thomas, Osbaldwick, dates to the twelfth century. It was appropriated to the Prebend of Strensall, and a vicarage ordained there, in 1485, and remained subject to the prebend’s peculiar jurisdiction until the nineteenth century. The living was augmented in 1767, 1787 and 1800. In 1843 the advowson was transferred from the prebend to the Archbishop of York.

The church dates to the twelfth century and was restored in 1877-1878 by J. A. Scott of London, the son of architect Sir Gilbert Scott, with stained glass by J. W. Knowles of York.

The parish includes Murton, which has had a chapel of ease, St James, from around the twelfth century. St James had fallen into disrepair by the nineteenth century and was not used after 1836. However it was restored in 1912-1914 and rededicated in 1914 and has been an active church ever since.

In 1936 part of Osbaldwick was separated to create the parish of York, St Hilda, while another part was added to York, Holy Trinity, Heworth.

Today the parish, which includes the churches of St Thomas and St James, is part of the benefice of Osbaldwick with Murton.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 2007.

Alternative Form Available

Selected records, including registers of christenings, marriages and burials, 1581-1900, banns, 1827-1900, churchwardens' accounts, 1815-1882, and a will extract, 1772-1838, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 748, 1757, 1767).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 02.03.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Related Material

The parish records of York, Holy Trinity, Heworth and York, St Hilda, Tang Hall are also deposited at the Borthwick Institute.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193