Manuscript Diary

Scope and Content

Pages from Gissing's diary, written when he was twelve: "10th. Saturday. This morning no fresh war news. Germans still reported to be marching on Paris. According to expectations Algie began his turn of the mumps this morning, which I have happily got over. A nice row those three: - Algie, Willie, and Maggie, kick up in that nursery! Not much illness among them. Today I invented, and intend to construct, a little model of a locomotive engine, working by steam, and also a model of a Roman trireme, the oars moving by steam. I have read J. Eastmead's lecture upon Gladstone's book Juventus Mundi. I wish I could have heard the lecture delivered, but I happened to be at the School of Art that night... 12th. Monday. Went to school. Ward who blew his face up with Sodium and Poppleton who fell off a pear tree have not come yet. I hope they will tomorrow. The boys are still getting on with the mumps. The Prussians are still approaching Paris. Nothing else of consequence... 15th. Thursday. This morning is Willie's birthday. I gave him a lead pencil as a present. Father has given us a very nice little book. It is called That's it, or Plain Teaching. It is profusely illustrated having upwards of 1,200 illustrations. It is a book by the author of The Reason Why which I have. I began to do Latin verses today for the first time."

Bibliography

Published in Letters of George Gissing to members of his family, collected and arranged by Algernon and Ellen Gissing (London: Constable & Company Ltd, 1927), pp. 4-7.