Parish records of Camblesforth

Scope and Content

Churchwardens’ records, including constables’ accounts, 1750-1851, overseers of the poor accounts, 1750-1769, 1792-1833, rental, 1825, and surveyors of highways accounts, 1756-1761, 1843; parish council general account receipt and payment book, 1924-1946; Vestry minute book, 1834-1894; enclosure award for Carlton and Camblesforth, n.d.

Administrative / Biographical History

The existence of a church in the manor of Drax is recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century, although the present parish church dates to the early twelfth. The manor and church, together with Little Airmyn, Barlow, and Camblesforth, were held by Ralph de Pagnell. In c.1128 the church was granted to the newly founded Augustinian Priory at Long Drax by his son, William. It was appropriated to the Priory in 1315.
Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries the advowson of the church passed to the Crown and it was held as a curacy until 1778, when the first vicar was instituted. The benefice was augmented in 1775 and 1786 through Queen Anne’s Bounty, and again in 1810, 1813 and 1814 through Parliamentary grants.
The parish church was expanded in the fourteenth century and was later restored by Charles Hodgson Fowler in 1896. Some of the windows are believed to have been transferred to the church from Drax Priory.
The parish historically included Drax, Long Drax (also known as Langrick), Camblesforth, Little Airmyn and Newland. Today Drax is part of the parish and united benefice of Carlton and Drax which includes the church of St Mary at Carlton, a peculiar of the Prebendary of Snaith until the nineteenth century, as well as Long Drax, Newland and Camblesforth.
Drax parish is also notable as the location of Drax Charity School, now known as The Read School.

Access Information

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1976. A further addition was made to the archive in 1998.

Note

The existence of a church in the manor of Drax is recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century, although the present parish church dates to the early twelfth. The manor and church, together with Little Airmyn, Barlow, and Camblesforth, were held by Ralph de Pagnell. In c.1128 the church was granted to the newly founded Augustinian Priory at Long Drax by his son, William. It was appropriated to the Priory in 1315.
Following the Dissolution of the Monasteries the advowson of the church passed to the Crown and it was held as a curacy until 1778, when the first vicar was instituted. The benefice was augmented in 1775 and 1786 through Queen Anne’s Bounty, and again in 1810, 1813 and 1814 through Parliamentary grants.
The parish church was expanded in the fourteenth century and was later restored by Charles Hodgson Fowler in 1896. Some of the windows are believed to have been transferred to the church from Drax Priory.
The parish historically included Drax, Long Drax (also known as Langrick), Camblesforth, Little Airmyn and Newland. Today Drax is part of the parish and united benefice of Carlton and Drax which includes the church of St Mary at Carlton, a peculiar of the Prebendary of Snaith until the nineteenth century, as well as Long Drax, Newland and Camblesforth.
Drax parish is also notable as the location of Drax Charity School, now known as The Read School.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 1998.

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 03.02.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Related Material

The parish records of Carlton by Snaith and Drax are also deposited at the Borthwick Institute.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193