Institutions of Physic

Scope and Content

Each lecture is dated but rarely numbered, and according to the introductory lecture they fall into three parts, health, diseases, and remedies. The numbering of lectures below is purely for descriptive purposes and represents the lectures in the order they appear in the manuscript.

The contents of the lectures are as follows: (1) introductory lecture, (2-4) history of physic, (5) some of philosophy behind the study of physic, (6) overview of structure of course & past approaches, (7) the simple solid, (8) elasticity, (9) cohesion of bodies, (10) composition of animal solids & aggregation, (11) state of a mixture, elasticity, pressure, extension, cellular texture, (12) variation in cellular texture, (13) state of the vessels & pathology of simple solids, (14) physiology of simple solids & disease of naturally hard parts, (15) nervous system, (16) brain & nerves (17) mind of man, (18-22) sensation, heat and cold, law of custom, consciousness, & sensibility and nerves, (23) circumstances relative to reflex sensation, (24) sensation & memory, (25) action of moving fibres & contractibility of muscles, (26) movability of different organs, (27) stimulants & sedatives upon the nerves & muscles, (28) cause of muscular contraction, (29) muscular contraction, cohesion, and elasticity, (30) Stahlian system & function of the brain, (31) passions and propensities, (32) role of volition in movement etc., (33) relation of parts, (34-36) phenomena independent of sensation or volition, existence of the soul, & laws of habit and custom, (37-38) remote and proximate causes of sleep and waking, (39-40) different states of the brain & causes of death, (41) acquired habits & sympathy, (42) circulation, (43) absorption, motion of the fluids, & powers moving the blood, (44) force of the heart, (45) motion of the blood, (46-47) theories & laws of circulation, (48) causes of change in velocity & derivation and revulsion, (49) derivation, (50-52) respiration, (53) natural functions, (54-55) appetite & thirst, (55) nourishment, (56-57) digestion, (58-59) fermentation, (60) pancreatic juice, bile, & chyle, (61-62) absorption of matter from the atmosphere, (63-65) analysis of the blood, (66) gluten & extravasated blood, (67) uses of the different parts of the blood, (68-69) constituents of blood, (70) mechanical motion, (71) animal heat & secretion, (72) nutrition, (73) menstrual evacuation, (74-75) pathology, (76) predispositions, (77) fluids, (78-79) secretion & excretion, (80) acid in the blood, (81-82) chyle vitia, (83) excess of different parts of the blood, (84-85) morbi humorum relativi, (86) pathology of the nervous system, (87) mobility, (88) tension, (89) symptomatologia, (90-93) mental affections, (94) loss of appetite, (95) vomiting, (96-97) doctrine of means, (98-100) nutrients, effects of & occasions of their use, (101) corrosives & astringents, (102) emollients & resolvents, (103) inspissants, (104) antacids, antalkalines, demulcents, & tonics, (105) atonics & narcotics, (106) blood-letting, (107) stimulants & emetics, (108) cathartics, (109) poisons, (110) diuretics & diaphoretics, (111) errhines & expectorants, (112) sialogogues & stimulants, (113) heat, (114) cold, (115) exercise & passions.

Throughout Cullen extensively references the works of Albrecht von Haller (1708-1777), Robert Whytt (1714-1766), and Hieronymous David Gaubius (1705-1780) with particular reference to Gaubius' Institutiones Pathologiae Medicinalis.

The volume bears the bookplate of the Radford Library, Saint Mary's Hospital, Manchester, which also indicates that it was allocated the reference number Q133 viz. their 1877 catalogue. The volume has since been referenced J6 C65 as part of an alternative system. The spine reads 'Cullen's Institutions'. There is no page numbering and the writing is on both the recto and the verso.