Parish records of Huttons Ambo

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1714-1774, 1778-1990; register of marriages, 1714-1977, 1979-2005; register of burials, 1714-1772, 1776-1782, 1787-1928 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1810-1812, ages only); register of banns, 1824-1935; register of services, 1912-1978; records concerning benefice income, including glebe deeds, 1742, 1818-1839, glebe valuation, 1896, 1914, glebe papers, 1911-1912, 1919, sequestration and augmentation papers, 1880-1924, and tithe paper, 1922; charity correspondence, 1956; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1865-1926, rebuilding accounts, 1855-1857, fabric papers, 1954-1965, and churchyard deeds, 1894-1896; records of incumbents, including extract from parsonage house deed, 1867, and statistical returns, 1918-1922; overseers’ records, including settlement certificate, 1731; school records, including correspondence and papers, 1912-1921, 1931, grant of site, 1857, and estimates, plans and notes of contributors for additions, 1892-1912; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minutes of meetings, 1871-1953, accounts, 1952, 1969, enclosure award, 1712; letter from Harry Corbett and Sooty, 1956.

Administrative / Biographical History

Huttons Ambo consists of the two villages of High Hutton (Hutton Bardolf) and Low Hutton (Hutton Colswayn). There was a church at High Hutton from at least 1202, when it was granted to Kirkham Priory by Ralph Bardolf. No vicarage was ordained therein but this became the parish church. It was dedicated to St Margaret of Scotland.

There was also a chapel in Low Hutton from at least the thirteenth century, although this was taken down in 1800 and the materials used to repair the roof of St Margaret’s.

Kirkham Priory held the church and chapel until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century, at which time it passed to the Crown who granted it to the See of York. The Archbishop of York held the advowson and the rectory from that time.

The living was augmented through Queen Anne’s Bounty in 1723 and 1810, and through Parliamentary Grant in 1811.

In 1856 the original church was demolished and replaced by the present building, which was erected on a new site to a design by Mr Rawlins Gould. A vicarage house was built in 1868 and the new church was restored in 1956 by Sir Albert Richardson.

Today St Margaret’s is part of the united benefice of the Howardian Group, which also includes Bulmer, Dalby near Skewsby and Terrington, Terrington and Welburn.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1973 by the Diocesan Registrar. Further additions were made to the archive in 1979, 1982, 1983, 1995 and 2005.

Note

Huttons Ambo consists of the two villages of High Hutton (Hutton Bardolf) and Low Hutton (Hutton Colswayn). There was a church at High Hutton from at least 1202, when it was granted to Kirkham Priory by Ralph Bardolf. No vicarage was ordained therein but this became the parish church. It was dedicated to St Margaret of Scotland.

There was also a chapel in Low Hutton from at least the thirteenth century, although this was taken down in 1800 and the materials used to repair the roof of St Margaret’s.

Kirkham Priory held the church and chapel until the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century, at which time it passed to the Crown who granted it to the See of York. The Archbishop of York held the advowson and the rectory from that time.

The living was augmented through Queen Anne’s Bounty in 1723 and 1810, and through Parliamentary Grant in 1811.

In 1856 the original church was demolished and replaced by the present building, which was erected on a new site to a design by Mr Rawlins Gould. A vicarage house was built in 1868 and the new church was restored in 1956 by Sir Albert Richardson.

Today St Margaret’s is part of the united benefice of the Howardian Group, which also includes Bulmer, Dalby near Skewsby and Terrington, Terrington and Welburn.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 2005.

Alternative Form Available

Registers of christenings, 1714-1867, marriages, 1714-1836, burials, 1714-1885, and banns, 1824-1900, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 713, 1762).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 22.02.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193