Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Thomas Rutherford (1752-1806) was born in Corzenside, Northumberland. His father was Scottish and both his parents were devout Presbyterians. Rutherford began to attend Methodist preaching in 1767, a year after he had been left an orphan. After some early misgivings, he joined the society in 1769 and entered the itinerancy five years later. Rutherford exercised an active circuit ministry in England, Scotland and Ireland for thirty-three years and . He superannuated in 1805 because of ill health and died in London. Source: Arminian Magazine 1806, 426 and Arminian Magazine 1808, 337ff
  • William Hunter (1728-97) was born in the village of Placey, Northumberland. He was greatly affected by the preaching of Christopher Hopper in 1744 and was finally converted. Hunter began to preach locally and founded a small society before entering the itinerancy in 1767. His active circuit ministry was exercised in the North of England and Scotland. He superannuated in 1794, first to Hexham and then Alnwick where he died a few days after preaching his last sermon. Source: Methodist Memorialby Charles Atmore (London 1871), 110-116, and An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick

From Glasgow to Mrs Susannah McAtee [or McAfee/McFey] at 11 Flood Street, Dublin. Her letter of January 25th arrived. He believes it his duty to 'assist my distrest fellow creatures. I assure you I do not repent visiting your late husband as he was very teachable. He had no reflection at all upon you. He told me that you did all in your power to dissuaide him from what brought all his trouble upon him. If you go to the Lord by prayer with all your distress, I believe he will comfort your heart and supply your wants.'. She should not give herself up to sorrowing too much, but should think of her children. Bardsley thinks that the best that she can do is return home as he thinks that it would be cheaper for her to live in her own country and will hopefully meet with more friends. If she was resident in this kingdom [Scotland], Bardsley would try to send her a little [money]. He has a friend in Dublin whose name is [Thomas] Rutherford - he is a minister at [John] Wesley's chapel in the city. Bardsley will write to him by this same post and mention McAtee's distress. She should wait upon him with this letter and perhaps he will assist her [with money]. Rutherford lives near the chapel.

McAtee should let Bardsley know how she and the children are and whether or not she intends to come to this country. 'I am dear Mrs McAtee your unknown but sympathizing friend and servant for Christ's sake'.

Note

Notes

  • Thomas Rutherford (1752-1806) was born in Corzenside, Northumberland. His father was Scottish and both his parents were devout Presbyterians. Rutherford began to attend Methodist preaching in 1767, a year after he had been left an orphan. After some early misgivings, he joined the society in 1769 and entered the itinerancy five years later. Rutherford exercised an active circuit ministry in England, Scotland and Ireland for thirty-three years and . He superannuated in 1805 because of ill health and died in London. Source: Arminian Magazine 1806, 426 and Arminian Magazine 1808, 337ff
  • William Hunter (1728-97) was born in the village of Placey, Northumberland. He was greatly affected by the preaching of Christopher Hopper in 1744 and was finally converted. Hunter began to preach locally and founded a small society before entering the itinerancy in 1767. His active circuit ministry was exercised in the North of England and Scotland. He superannuated in 1794, first to Hexham and then Alnwick where he died a few days after preaching his last sermon. Source: Methodist Memorialby Charles Atmore (London 1871), 110-116, and An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers…1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick