Letter

Scope and Content

Note

  • William Brammah (d.1780) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire. He began to exhort locally in 1752 and started to preach the following year. Brammah entered the itinerancy in 1763 and exercised an active circuit ministry until his death which occurred in his home town in 1780. Charles Atmore described Brammah as a 'plain, honest man, of deep piety and great zeal.His talents for the ministry were so remarkably small that it was almost proverbial, "Hear Mr Brammah once, and you will hear all he has to say, let his text be what it will".'. He was nevertheless very popular with ordinary people, despite, or perhaps because of his fondness for sleep, tobacco, spirits and food. He was also regarded with affection by John Wesley, who once said of him that "He enjoys a good deal of the grace of God, but with a touch of enthusiasm". Brammah was married at the time of his entry into the itinerancy. It is said that his wife sold her furniture in Sheffield and walked all the way to Cornwall, a distance of three hundred miles, so that she could join her husband in his first appointment. She died in 1779. Source:History of Norfolk Street Wesleyan Chapel and Wesleyan Methodism in Sheffield by Revd. T. Alexander Seed (Sheffield Wesleyan Mission, 1907), 23, 28-29, Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1801), 64-65 and A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel Rogal (Edwin Mellen Press 1997)

From near Todmorden [part of the Colne circuit where Bardsley and Brammah were stationed in 1776] to [William] Brammah at Samuel Hunter's house in Padiham [part of the Colne circuit.] Bardsley wishes his colleague 'grace & glory' and hopes that there will be good work done in Burnley. If Brammah thinks that it is 'proper' to go on Sunday from Padiham after preaching at noon, Bardsley will be glad. If Brammah cannot preach in the street, he may preach in William Bolton's house. Brammah should also inform the people that there will be preaching at Padiham on the Tuesday night following. Brammah will not have to go to Danaeshaw[?] on Tusday noon as the 'young man' [one of the local preachers] will preach there on Monday noon. As they have a little society at Haslingden, Bardsley has made a little alteration which they will settle at the Quarterly meeting. On Tuesday, Brammah goes from Padiham to Hollin Yate; Thursday, Sykeside; Friday, Mill End; Saturday night, Hollin Yate; Sunday morning, Haslingden; Sunday noon, Mill End and on Sunday night, Brammah will go to Bacup. He should make the announcement for the fortnight following. Bardsley hopes that Brammah will get to Colne on the Monday, arriving by noon from Bacup.

Note

Note

  • William Brammah (d.1780) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire. He began to exhort locally in 1752 and started to preach the following year. Brammah entered the itinerancy in 1763 and exercised an active circuit ministry until his death which occurred in his home town in 1780. Charles Atmore described Brammah as a 'plain, honest man, of deep piety and great zeal.His talents for the ministry were so remarkably small that it was almost proverbial, "Hear Mr Brammah once, and you will hear all he has to say, let his text be what it will".'. He was nevertheless very popular with ordinary people, despite, or perhaps because of his fondness for sleep, tobacco, spirits and food. He was also regarded with affection by John Wesley, who once said of him that "He enjoys a good deal of the grace of God, but with a touch of enthusiasm". Brammah was married at the time of his entry into the itinerancy. It is said that his wife sold her furniture in Sheffield and walked all the way to Cornwall, a distance of three hundred miles, so that she could join her husband in his first appointment. She died in 1779. Source:History of Norfolk Street Wesleyan Chapel and Wesleyan Methodism in Sheffield by Revd. T. Alexander Seed (Sheffield Wesleyan Mission, 1907), 23, 28-29, Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1801), 64-65 and A Biographical Dictionary of 18th century Methodism by Samuel Rogal (Edwin Mellen Press 1997)