Letter

Scope and Content

Note

  • Thomas Carlill (d.1801) entered the itinerancy in 1760. He exercised an active circuit ministry for thirty-eight years in England, Wales and Ireland before superannuation in 1797. He died at Horncastle in Lincolnshire. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.350 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818

From Nottingham to [Peter] Mill at the preaching house in Gainsborough. He begs that Mill will pardon Bardsley for not writing sooner. Mrs Corbet's money arrived safely. Brother Platt took the first quarter [financial contribution] to Loughborough and Bardsley delivered the last quarter on Brother Corbet's instruction to Mr [Thomas] Cook. They delivered the money as soon as it came to hand.

Mill should write to Bardsley at the house of John Platt in Goose [missing second word of the place name].

The work is proceeding well here with good congregations and some increase in the society.

Bardsley trusts that Mill and his wife and children are well.

When Mill writes to Fraserburgh, he should pass on Bardsley's regards.

In a postscript, he asks that his love be passed to Messrs [Thomas] Carlill and Forshaw.

Note

Note

  • Thomas Carlill (d.1801) entered the itinerancy in 1760. He exercised an active circuit ministry for thirty-eight years in England, Wales and Ireland before superannuation in 1797. He died at Horncastle in Lincolnshire. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.350 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818