Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Joseph Sanderson/Saunderson (d.1803) entered the itinerancy in 1773 and served in the active circuit ministry in England and Scotland. He superannuated in 1799 and spent the rest of his life in Aberdeen. Source: Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818
  • Dr James Hamilton (1740-1827) was born at Dunbar in Scotland. His early life is obscure although it is known that he served as a surgeon on a warship from 1759 to 1763 and later practised medicine in his native town. He was converted in 1762 and joined the small Methodist society in Dunbar. Hamilton had become a local preacher by 1770 and two years later treated John Wesley during one of his visits to the area. Wesley regarded Hamilton very highly and in 1789 accorded him the honour of asking him to preach to the Conference. After Wesley's death, Hamilton moved briefly to Leeds and then to London, where he held the post of physician to the London Dispensary. He lived close to City Road Chapel where he was frequently called upon to preach. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism(1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • Peter Mill (1751-1806) was born near Arbroath and entered the itinerancy in 1774. He exercised an active circuit ministry in England, Ireland and Scotland until superannuation through ill health to Hull in 1804. Source: Minutes of Conference 1806, Wesley Swift, Methodism in Scotland, The First Hundred Years (Epworth Press, 1947), 41, and Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818
  • Duncam McAllum (1751-1834) was born in Argyll, Scotland, the son of a retainer of the Duke of Argyll. He became a Methodist preacher at the age of nineteen and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty-one years, almost entirely in Scotland. He had originally wanted to go as a missionary to Africa but was persuaded by Wesley to travel in the Scottish Highlands where his command of Gaelic proved essential. Highly regarded by Wesley, who affectionately christened him the 'North Star', McAllum was ordained in 1787 for the work in Scotland. Many of the first Methodist societies in Scotland owe their birth to McAllum's evangelism. His son Daniel also served as a Wesleyan minister. McAllum superannuated in 1826 and retired to the home of his daughter-in-law. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • Abia Affleck (1742-1808) was born at Burton House near York, the daughter of William Minethorp. She began to attend Methodist preaching in 1759 and was converted four years later by a sermon preached by her brother W. Minethorp. In 1768 she married Andrew Affleck and moved to Chesterhall near Dunbar in Scotland where she continued a devout member of the society until her death from a 'nervous fever' on January 7 1808. Source: Methodist Magazine 1809, 173 For John Wesley's reply to this letter see The Letters of John Wesley, edited by John Telford (London Epworth Press, 1931), vol.VII, 103-104

From Inverness [Bardsley was stationed in the Aberdeen circuit] to Joseph Sanderson [stationed in Edinburgh between 1781 and 1783] at the house of Dr James Hamilton in Dunbar. The Methodists are doing reasonably well here - 'only Brother [John] Watson has left us in a pet, on account of Brother [Peter] Mill [Assistant in the Aberdeen circuit in 1781] removing back to Mr Comies[?]. On that account I could not use such freedom with him as I could have wished. I expect he will be at Edinboro in a few days where he intends to see you. As I believe he is not much if any acquainted if any with your connection with Miss S., I think it would be well for you not to mention any thing concerning that affair to him as I fear he would make a wrong use of it and it would be well for you to give this hint to Mr [Duncan] McAllum as John Watson speaks of seeing him'.

Bardsley has not heard Miss S. say a word about the affair but a friend asked Bardsley to send a word to Sanderson so that it would be known that Watson has left the society.

When Sanderson has some time, he should send Bardsley a letter - he expects to be here for several weeks.

Bardsley's dear love should be passed to Dr Hamilton and his family, as well as to Mr [Andrew] Affleck and his wife [Abia].

Note

Notes

  • Joseph Sanderson/Saunderson (d.1803) entered the itinerancy in 1773 and served in the active circuit ministry in England and Scotland. He superannuated in 1799 and spent the rest of his life in Aberdeen. Source: Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818
  • Dr James Hamilton (1740-1827) was born at Dunbar in Scotland. His early life is obscure although it is known that he served as a surgeon on a warship from 1759 to 1763 and later practised medicine in his native town. He was converted in 1762 and joined the small Methodist society in Dunbar. Hamilton had become a local preacher by 1770 and two years later treated John Wesley during one of his visits to the area. Wesley regarded Hamilton very highly and in 1789 accorded him the honour of asking him to preach to the Conference. After Wesley's death, Hamilton moved briefly to Leeds and then to London, where he held the post of physician to the London Dispensary. He lived close to City Road Chapel where he was frequently called upon to preach. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism(1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • Peter Mill (1751-1806) was born near Arbroath and entered the itinerancy in 1774. He exercised an active circuit ministry in England, Ireland and Scotland until superannuation through ill health to Hull in 1804. Source: Minutes of Conference 1806, Wesley Swift, Methodism in Scotland, The First Hundred Years (Epworth Press, 1947), 41, and Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818
  • Duncam McAllum (1751-1834) was born in Argyll, Scotland, the son of a retainer of the Duke of Argyll. He became a Methodist preacher at the age of nineteen and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty-one years, almost entirely in Scotland. He had originally wanted to go as a missionary to Africa but was persuaded by Wesley to travel in the Scottish Highlands where his command of Gaelic proved essential. Highly regarded by Wesley, who affectionately christened him the 'North Star', McAllum was ordained in 1787 for the work in Scotland. Many of the first Methodist societies in Scotland owe their birth to McAllum's evangelism. His son Daniel also served as a Wesleyan minister. McAllum superannuated in 1826 and retired to the home of his daughter-in-law. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • Abia Affleck (1742-1808) was born at Burton House near York, the daughter of William Minethorp. She began to attend Methodist preaching in 1759 and was converted four years later by a sermon preached by her brother W. Minethorp. In 1768 she married Andrew Affleck and moved to Chesterhall near Dunbar in Scotland where she continued a devout member of the society until her death from a 'nervous fever' on January 7 1808. Source: Methodist Magazine 1809, 173 For John Wesley's reply to this letter see The Letters of John Wesley, edited by John Telford (London Epworth Press, 1931), vol.VII, 103-104