Letter

Scope and Content

Note

  • Mrs S. Standering (d.1784) was born in Newry, Northern Ireland. According to her obituary by the preacher Christopher Hopper, 'her parents were credible people and brought her up in a moral way'. She was converted by the preaching of the itinerant John Hampson, an experience so dramatic that 'she dropt down in the market place at Newry as if she had been dead'. She was married to the itinerant John Standering in about 1765 and the couple lived in Bolton in Lancashire where her husband died four years after the marriage. She moved to Manchester at an unspecified date. Standering suffered from very poor health for the last sixteen years of her life, which included a temporary blindness. Her last illness was particularly severe and lasted for twenty weeks before she died at the end of October 1784. Source: Arminian Magazine 1785, 80-81

From Nottingham to 'Jere' [his brother Jeremiah] Bardsley in Tib Lane, Manchester. He duly received Jeremiah's very welcome letters. He was glad to discover that the work prospers at Failsworth and hopes that Mrs [S.] Standering 'has gone to rest'. 'I am ready to think we shall do as well upon the present plan as any other so that the [Anglican] clergy will do best by themselves, especially as their hearts are not wholly in the Lord's work'. [This is almost certainly a reference to John Wesley's Deed of Declaration of February 1784 which legally defined the shape and powers of Conference, thereby ensuring that Methodism would survive its founder's death.]

They have had no remarkable revival here as yet. Bardsley hopes to see his brother at Manchester on January 7th [1785]. He hopes to pay Mr Rogerson when he comes.

Note

Note

  • Mrs S. Standering (d.1784) was born in Newry, Northern Ireland. According to her obituary by the preacher Christopher Hopper, 'her parents were credible people and brought her up in a moral way'. She was converted by the preaching of the itinerant John Hampson, an experience so dramatic that 'she dropt down in the market place at Newry as if she had been dead'. She was married to the itinerant John Standering in about 1765 and the couple lived in Bolton in Lancashire where her husband died four years after the marriage. She moved to Manchester at an unspecified date. Standering suffered from very poor health for the last sixteen years of her life, which included a temporary blindness. Her last illness was particularly severe and lasted for twenty weeks before she died at the end of October 1784. Source: Arminian Magazine 1785, 80-81